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Crowdfunding vs. Peer-to-Peer Lending

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With the internet making several new forms of funding available to entrepreneurs who want to sidestep the hassles and qualification of getting bank financing, there's a little confusion about peer-to-peer lending sites and how they're different from crowdfunding.

I'm going to explain the difference, and some of the advantages and disadvantages of each.

Peer-to-Peer Lending

Peer-to-Peer (or P2P) Lending transactions occur between individuals without going through a bank or traditional intermediary. Without the middleman, borrowers can get better terms and access to more capital than before, and lenders can earn higher returns.
 
And as can be expected, there are several popular websites that connect borrowers and lenders directly, such as:

  • Prosper.com
  • LendingClub.com
  • Zopa.com
  • IOUCentral.com

 

The downside of P2P lending is that supposedly less than 10% of loans applied for on these sites get funded. And you have to pay back the loans.
 
Crowdfunding

With crowdfunding, you' can tap a lot more investors and raise unlimited amounts of money. And, you provide rewards for those who give you money rather than needing to repay a loan. And, your chances of raising crowdfunding are much higher than with P2P lending; statistics show that 50% of entrepreneurs who try to raise crowdfunding successfully do so.

With regards to rewards, with Crowdfunding you want to offer something to the people who help fund your project, such as future redemption of the product or service you are creating, discounts, prizes, gifts and bonuses.

A percentage of the money raised will in all likelihood come from friends, family, and people in your existing contacts. However, crowdfunding sites give you an organized and safe way to advertise the opportunity, and people can see the social proof of others getting on board and funding your project.

Examples of crowdfunding sites are:

  • Kickstarter.com
  • Rockethub.com
  • IndieGogo.com

 

{Note: There is also a type of funding called "Micro-funding," which is a means of offering funds to impoverished people who don't have access to traditional forms of loans. These funding amounts are generally very small and are used by the recipients to launch personal businesses, such as sewing, trading, making crafts, and other manageable ventures where a little funding can go a long way for the person and their family.}

I prefer crowdfunding over Peer to Peer Lending because of the potential to raise more money through a larger group of people, and not having to pay the money back (nor interest). However, I like diversifying my funding, so you should also check out the peer-to-peer lending sites to decide if they're worth pursuing for your business.

 

Suggested Resource: Do you want Crowdfunding? If so, don't try to raise it from scratch -- the 14-step blueprint already exists. Get the Crowdfunding blueprint here.


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