Growthink Blog

Who Gets Funded? Great Businesses vs. Great Presentations


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From businesses come needs – like raising capital. Raising capital usually means pitching investors.

So which businesses are most likely to be among the approximately 5% who raise funds from professional investors? The chart below tells the brutal truth quickly and easily.

 

A great business which gives a great presentation is most likely getting funded.
A lousy business with a lousy presentation isn’t getting funded.

But what about a good business with a lousy presentation? Is it more or less likely to get funding compared to a good business with a great presentation? The answer probably won't surprise you.

After speaking with over 110 angel investors, VCs, entrepreneurs and educators, the consensus was solidly in favor of the good business with a great presentation. The deciding factor came down to the team, the single factor which most influences investors.

A person and a team who made a great presentation took the time to practice. Investors like to see the results of preparation and hard work. A great team willing to practice may simply need some advice and be willing to pivot, changing a good business into a great business.

A good business which gives a lousy presentation says to investors, “We didn’t care enough to put in our best effort.” The lack of preparation and the condescending attitude toward investors will derail just about any business seeking capital.

At the very least, it says the team is not ready, not mature enough, and probably not coachable.  With plenty of investing opportunities from which to choose, investors quickly move on.

Want to improve your chances when pitching to investors? Follow the eight recommendations below to maximize your chance of raising capital.

PRACTICE your pitch

If you didn’t practice 25-50 times before presenting, it will show in your lack of confidence, poor pacing, and use of filler words like “uh”, “um” and “like”. Then you’ll likely resort to the boring reading-slides-to-your-audience-with-your-back-turned method of pitching. Buy the coffin. You’re dead.

GENERATE some enthusiasm!

No one expects you to have over-the-top local sportscaster enthusiasm. But don’t pitch with a sleep-inducing monotone, either. If you don’t have passion for your business, neither will an investor.

PREPARE for contingencies

Fertilizer happens. Prepare for it.

* Know every slide in your pitch deck by heart

* Have two thumb drives with your pitch deck saved in PowerPoint / Keynote and PDF

* Bring your own laptop, projector, clicker, batteries, microphone, cables and cords

* Inspect the room beforehand, if possible. Know the lighting and sound conditions

BREVITY is king

Got 10 minutes to pitch? Finish in 9:45. Almost nobody finishes with a strong close in the allotted time. Investors love someone who can manage time effectively. It sends the message that you can manage other areas of business effectively, too. Keep your pitch deck to 10-12 slides maximum.

NAIL the opening and closing

Tell a brief story; do something unexpected; focus on emotion. Those are great concepts to open a pitch. Close powerfully with your call to action. Now think about how most people open speeches – and don’t do that.

STORIES sell

Sprinkle in stories to drive home a point, to magnify emotions, and to keep your audience engaged. Generally, a single story should take no longer than about 7% of your total pitch time. For a 10 minute pitch, a story is most effective when 45 seconds or less.

Use storyboarding, a technique invented by Walt Disney in the 1930s, to create your overall theme. Do this before designing your pitch deck.

VISUALS, not text

Your pitch deck should be primarily visual. You’re the focus, not your pitch deck. If your slides are full of text, your investor audience is reading the slides and not listening to you. Your audience can read faster than you can speak. When they finish and you’re still talking, they’ll disconnect. After that, they’re almost impossible to re-engage. Great visuals enhance your story because vision is the most dominant sense in people.

WIIFI: What’s In It For Investors?

Why you? Why now? Why should an investor care? When your pitch answers those questions in a concise yet detailed manner, your chance of funding improves.

Knowing your investor audience is essential. Pitching friends and family is somewhat causal, pitch angel investors is more serious and pitching institutional investors is sophisticated. Tailor your pitch accordingly.

Successfully raising investor funding is often a long, frustrating and complex process. Getting turned down dozens or hundreds of times will test an entrepreneur’s patience. Persistence doesn’t guarantee success but quitting guarantees failure. Investors use the process to find the most resilient entrepreneurs worthy of funding. Getting investor funding will often change your life and your world for the better. The guidelines above will make your process faster and easier.

P.S. The author Luke Brown is an Engagement Partner with Growthink.  If you would like to discuss how Growthink could help in creating your presentation for you, do reach out to Luke directly at [email protected], and / or at 310-846-5047


The Affinity Formula for Raising Money


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Let’s say you’ve developed a new type of stethoscope.

Who should you approach to invest in your company?

  • A local sports star?
  • The owner of a local grocery chain?
  • An executive at a local corporation?
  • A doctor?


Well, if you answered all of the above, you are correct.

But if you want the best bang for your buck…or the most investment dollars per time you spend raising money, clearly approaching doctors is your best route.

Doctors would clearly understand the benefits of your new stethoscope and be the most prone to invest in you.

Targeting doctors to invest in your product is classic affinity marketing, or targeting people based on their established buying patterns or trends.  Classic examples of affinity marketing include a university-branded credit card marketed to the university’s alumni. Or an insurance company working with a pet association to offer a pet insurance product.

You get the point. By targeting customers that have affinities (to their alma maters or pets in the above examples), you target folks that really understand and care about what you are offering.

In money raising, this is similar to “prospective customer financing,” which is asking your potential future customers to invest in your company now.

I’m a huge fan of prospective customer financing, because not only do you gain investors, but loyal customers who also help market your business through positive word of mouth.

So, how do you execute on affinity fundraising or prospective customer financing?

To begin, the best way to raise this type of money is through Crowdfunding. As you’ll learn in this Crowdfunding video, crowdfunding has tons of advantages. But in brief, crowdfunding will allow you to raise smaller amounts of money, and because it is neither debt nor equity, you avoid the legal and regulatory issues which will slow you down and cost you a lot of money.

Finally, let me give you some more examples of what to do:

Let’s say your venture targets the bird market. Well, you should be going on social networks, forums and websites serving this market. Join the conversation. Become a valued member of the community. And then tell other members about your venture, that you are raising money, and how they can contribute.

Or, let’s say your venture targets accountants. Do the same thing…..Find out where accountants congregate online. What accounting groups are there on LinkedIn? Where can you find them on Facebook? What accounting forums can you join? And once again, join the conversation. Become a trusted and valued member of the community. And then let your new friends know about your venture – something that will directly serve them – and how to contribute.

Once again, the best way to turn these affinity group members into investors is via Crowdfunding. So if you haven’t set up your Crowdfunding account yet, watch this video now.


Forget Venture Capital: Vringo Takes A Unique Approach to Raising $9.2 million


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Last week, Vringo, a video ringtone company raised $9.2 million.

That’s a lot of money, particularly considering that Vringo only generated $20,000 in revenues last year.

What’s most interesting is how Vringo raised the money.

It didn’t raise the money from venture capitalists, angel investors, or any of the usual suspects. Which is particularly surprising since Vringo’s CEO and co-founder, Jon Medved, was formerly a venture capitalist himself.

And it’s surprising since Vringo had previously raised $17 million in venture capital.

So what did Vringo do instead?

Vringo decided to go public on the New York Stock Exchange.

Vringo sold 2.4 million shares at $4.60 per share for a total of $11 million. (The stock price has since decreased to $3.80 per share.)

In an interview with the New York Times, Medved sited a couple of key advantages of being a public company, including:

1. It gives credibility. This credibility is key to a small company, particularly if it is selling to big customers who might be skeptical of their ability to stay around long-term.

2. It helps with recruiting top management talent, particularly since the value of/likelihood of exercising employee stock options appears greater.

The huge negatives of going public however were the massive amount of time required to do the pre-IPO roadshow and the $1.8 MILLION in estimated offering fees.

That is a lot of money -- and unfortunately precludes most other entrepreneurs from taking this route.  But, I would imagine that with the right law firm, these fees could have been dramatically reduced, to half that amount or less. But which would still require an entrepreneur to raise an angel round to fund the expense of going public.

According to Medved in his NY Times interview, when asked about whether he would recommend going public to other smaller companies, he replied: “I would certainly tell them to think about it, and not to rule it out. It’s a mistake to rule it out from first moment. Most people don’t even think it’s possible. We proved it’s not only possible, but it works.”

Next week, I will be unveiling an even more creative funding source than taking your company public. With this brand new source, you’re not going to raise $9.2 million (it works for smaller amounts of money). But, you won’t need to spend a penny on fees, you can raise the money really quickly, it’s practically foolproof, and you don’t ever have to pay the money back….pretty exciting stuff.


Easy to Raise Money - A Bad Thing?


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If raising money was easy, would it be a bad thing?

Well, according to Bob Johansen, in his book "Get There Early," the tension between people with ideas and people with money provides the energy for innovation.

He further states that if this dilemma were solved, that creative energy would dwindle.

Now, I don’t necessarily agree with this, because the reason why entrepreneurs go into business is NOT to raise money.

Rather, that majority of entrepreneurs go into business for other reasons. For example, according to a recent survey by Grasshopper, 44% of entrepreneurs started their business since they “saw an opportunity to make something great.” Eighteen percent started their business “to fulfill my life dream.” And 7% started “to help others/give back.”

But, raising money is a necessary evil for most entrepreneurs.

And, I do agree that if it were too easy to raise money that it would be a bad thing. Why? Because there would be too much competition.

I often give my barber example to explain this. I grew up in a small town called Rockville Centre in Long Island, NY. The town had about 30,000 residents and two barber shops.

Well, what if raising money was too easy and 8 new aspiring barber shop owners each opened up stores. That would make 10 barber shops in one small town. Clearly the market couldn’t support that. And most likely virtually all the barber shops would go out of business (and the last one standing may not have been the best one, but the one with the most money in its coffers).

So, if raising money was too easy, there would be too much competition.

But, should raising money be as hard as it is? Clearly not.

And it isn’t if you invest in learning how to raise money. I see raising money as similar to someone passing the bar exam. Passing the bar exam is not about knowing what’s wrong and right (which is what the law should be about). It’s about doing your homework and understanding how things work. It’s the same thing with raising money.


Calvin Coolidge Was Almost Right


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For many years, I had a poster on my wall with a quote from Calvin Coolidge, the 30th American President. Coolidge believed persistence was the most important attribute you can have.

He said:

..............


Growthink Client Integreon Raises $50 Million


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In 2002, the CEO of Integreon, Liam Brown, sat in Growthink's offices in Los Angeles.

Integreon was just getting started and had 4 employees. 

In the subsequent months, we worked with Integreon on its strategy and to developed its business plan.

The rest, as they say is history.

After raising rounds of capital and growing like gangbusters, Integreon is now a global provider of outsourced research, legal and business Knowledge Process Outsourcing (KPO) services. It currently has 2,000 employees and offices throughout the world.

And just today, the company announced that it raised another $50 million in expansion capital.

But the big amount is not what excited me most when I heard about the raise. It was the one tiny phrase in the press release that most others probably missed: "a substantial minority stake."

I like when the $50 million investment only accounted for a "minority stake" in the company.  It means the company is worth over $100 million, and probably much more than that.

Yes, the right strategy and business plan can produce amazing results!

 


Here's Your Chance to Pitch Silicon Valley This May


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A couple weeks ago, Growthink hosted the "Startup Success Secrets" expert teleseminar series. 

We assembled an impressive group of entrepreneurship experts, including Ken Yancey (CEO of SCORE), Ryan Allis (CEO of iContact), and Bambi Francisco of Vator.tv, among others.

If you don't recall, Vator.tv is an online community that allows entrepreneurs to showcase their ventures and communicate with customers, partners, and investors.  I fully recommend that you register at Vator.tv.  

But that’s actually NOT why I’m writing today...

Today, I'm writing to you about Vator's upcoming "Splash" showcase, where you'll have an opportunity to pitch Silicon Valley.

We're excited to say that we secured a 25% discount for you to attend the "Splash" Showcase, which will showcase 10 promising startups, and the hottest companies in commerce and social networking, as well as blue-chip venture capitalists.

On the evening of May 13, Thursday, in San Francisco, 10 seed- to early-stage companies selected by their peers will have the opportunity to pitch an audience of nearly 400 people including the Silicon Valley elite. These 10 companies will also have a high quality video of their presentation produced. 

In addition, Tony Hsieh, CEO of Zappos, will talk about how he built and sold his company to Amazon for $1.2 billion, and Gurbaksh Chahal, CEO of gWallet, will talk about being a serial entrepreneur since the age of 16, and selling two companies for a combined $340 million. Additionally, venture capitalists from Founders Fund, August Capital, Mayfield and LightSpeed Ventures will be present.  

You can reserve a 25% discounted ticket or pitch table below when you use the discount code "Vatorgrowthink" here: http://vatorsplashmay.eventbrite.com/


And here's where you can submit an early-stage company to pitch: http://vator.tv/competition/vator-splash

 


Thinking About Selling a Private Business in the Next Few Years?


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If you're even considering selling your midsize company in the next couple years, here's the bottom line:  you should start the process now.

No kidding. 

That does not mean you should officially list your business for sale.  It means you as the business owner should start some of the "behind the scenes" efforts (that is, preparation) that will enable you to maximize the value of your company during a sale and enhance the terms you'll negotiate as early as possible. 

Sound counterintuitive? 

We certainly understand:  you've been growing and leading your company for years, not working to sell it.  You've been building it to last, not flip.   The principals at Growthink have been in your shoes.  We've started and grown businesses ourselves.   And we've sold them too.   We've learned lot of lessons along the way during our collective 100 plus years of start-up and business advisory experience.

But only about one of every three or four businesses successfully reaches a closing after they are listed for sale

That's a discouraging statistic, but one that can be overcome.    And consider, too, that various sources note that up to 75% of all business owners are planning to sell their businesses within five to ten years, creating a massive inventory of available businesses competing with you for buyers' attention.  

Why should you care?

What's one of the key differences between those business owners who execute a successful sale of their company on good terms and those who fail to close?  

Simply knowing the process well in advance, focusing on a few essential actions as early as possible, and taking a comprehensive approach that is integrated into your overall business management and planning process.    

Growthink's approach is unique and designed specifically for business owners.    Unlike accountants, lawyers, business brokers and other intermediaries, we believe in a comprehensive approach to optimizing the chances of selling a business for the highest price and on the best terms for the owner.

We recommend you focus on three distinct initiatives months (or years) before you officially offer the company for sale:

1. Enhancing Your Business Plan to Increase Your Value - and Sales Price.  Since 1999, we've helped 2,000 clients build their business plans and strategies.  We'll show you how to achieve a value for your firm that includes its future growth opportunities, not only its past performance.   Consider why the stocks of some public companies in a certain sector command a premium price to others in the sector - it's because investors believe in the future prospects of that company compared to the others.   You should work on developing that premium value for your company through maximizing your business strategy - a process you're probably already doing anyway

2. A Complete Process.  These include all the steps involved in selling your business, from beginning to end (and even after the close).  Steps include improving your financial statements and records and thinking about future capital gains, estate and other tax issues as early as possible.

3. Creative Financing and Transactions.  You don't have to sell your business to your first bidder through a straight asset or stock sale.  We'll teach you a variety of structures to choose from, including tax efficient sales to your existing partners, recapitalizing the company so you keep a continued role, and selling to another company in your industry, among others.   All options offer advantages and disadvantages.    You'll learn why and what type of approach might be right for you.

Experience has shown that only a relative few midsize businesses start the sales process early and focus on a comprehensive approach.   Quite frankly, these business owners have a better chance of a successful outcome that those who don't plan. 

We encourage you to learn the basics - whenever you think you'll sell your business


Online Seminar - Thursday, January 7th at 1 PM PDT/4 PM EST

Join the expert Growthink team businesses for 45 minutes, and learn key lessons that will benefit you whenever you decide to sell your firm.   The official Growthink "Bottom Line Guide to Selling Your Business" will be provided to seminar attendees.  


Thursday, January 7th at 1 PM PDT/4 PM EST

During the online seminar, we'll also disclose the top mistakes owners make when selling their businesses (the land mines to avoid), as well as government actions that may be coming soon and affect your sales process (yup, think capital gains taxes). 

Sign up here.

Join the expert Growthink team and two entrepreneurs who recently sold their businesses for 45 minutes, and learn key lessons that will benefit you whenever you decide to sell your firm.   The official Growthink "Bottom Line Guide to Selling Your Business" will be provided to seminar attendees.  

Seminar Fee Waived for this Program.   Strictly First Come, First Serve
 
Since our webinar system is limited to 200 registrants, sign up right away to attend via the link below.
 
Sign up here

Look forward to your participation,

The Growthink Investment Banking Team


Top 50 Venture Capital Blog Posts of 2009


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Looking for venture capital? Or looking for great insights to grow your business?

Well, we've scoured a year's worth of great blog posts from hundreds of venture capitalists and industry experts, and are pleased to present you with our 50 favorite posts of 2009.

Some great information is included in these posts, and savvy entrepreneurs and investors will heed this advice.

And we'd love to hear your comments...what posts did we miss?

Enjoy!

 

 

1. Ed Sim (Dawntreader Ventures)


Inspirational video for entrepreneurs       

"Without a bigger sense of purpose, it is hard to be an entrepreneur and stick through the inevitable tough times that will come your way."


2. Josh Kopelman (First Round Capital)

Board Transparency - and the Implicit Web       

Discusses the repurcussions of accessible data and the necessity of transparency with your Board of Directors.


3. Jeremy Liew (Lightspeed Venture Partners)

Why the Economics of Social Gaming are So Attractive to Investors            

Trend to watch for in 2010: Social Gaming, this article tells you why.


4. Seth Levine (Foundry Group)

Want more jobs? Support Entrepreneurship       

Levine recommends taking the steps included in his blog article to boost the economy and create jobs.


5. Chistopher Allen (Alacrity Ventures)   

Community by the Numbers, Part III: Power Laws       

What defines the success of a community and how can we predict this?


6. Fred Wilson (Union Square Ventures)

Some Thoughts on Email After Dealing with 500 Emails       

An inside peak into VC email response.


7. Bill Gurley (Benchmark Capital)   

What is Really Happening to the Venture Capital Industry           

VC Bill Gurley takes readers through an overview of the ups and downs of 2009.


8. Paul Graham (Y Combinator)   

Startups in 13 Sentences       

If VC Paul Graham could tell startups 13 things, these would be them.


9. Dave Hornik (August Capital)   

Innovation Doesn't take a Vacation in an Economic Downturn        

Innovation isn't dependent upon finance. 


10. Brad Feld (Foundry Group)   

VC Behavior in Board Meetings       

Advice on putting the phone down, and paying attention at board meetings.


11. David McClure (Founders Fund)

Startup Metrics that Matter       

This vlog teaches new entreprenuers what metrics really matter in the early stages of their development.


12. Erick Schonfeld (Techcrunch)   

Venture Funds Raise Only $1.6 billion in 3rd Quarter.  Most of That Went to Vinod Khosla       

A quarterly overview on VC funds raised from Q3 2007 - Q3 2009.  $750 million of the $1.6 billion raised went to Khosla ventures.


13. MG Siegler (Techcrunch)   

The Cost of FriendFeed: Roughly $50 million in Cash and Stock       

A successful exit for a small social media startup; FriendFeed was purchased in August 2009 for $50 million.  Highlights the payout for initial investors.


14. Steve Fredrick and Don Rainey (VentureBeat)   

Venture Capital 2009: The Year in Review       

Highlights included 3 venture-backed IPOs in Q3 2009, an expanding start-up world and the reduced cash required to start companies.


15. Marc Andreessen (Andreessen Horowitz)

Introducing Our New Venture Capital Firm Andreessen Horowitz       

Announcing a new $300 million fund for technology startups. Investing between $50,000 and $50 million, this blog post outlines EXACTLY Andreessen Horowitz's requirements.


16. Laura Grimmer (VentureBeat)

5 Ways VC firms Can Stop Shooting Themselves in the Foot       

Excellent advice for VCs looking to grow their business and expand the pipeline of deals. 


17. Peter Rip (Crosslink Capital)

What's Broken - Venture Capital or Venture Perceptions?       

Refutes the idea that venture capital is the worst place to be because the "old model doesn't work."


18. Rick Segal (JLA Ventures)

The "Take the Deal or Not" Debate       

Questions every person should ask themselves before they take a deal with a venture capital firm.


19. Mike Hirshland (Polaris Venture Partners)   

More on the Founder/CEO Question       

When should the founder step aside as CEO for the greater good of the company?


20. Jeff Bussgang (Flybridge Capital Partners)   

Should Entrepreneurs Be More Like Teenage Girls?       

Recommendations for a growth mindset and success for reaching goals as an entrepreneur.


21. Tim Oren (Pacifica Fund)

Silicon Valley's Dirty Little Secret       

What are the long term social and political impacts of Silicon Valley? Some insightful thoughts into Silicon Valley culture.


22. Eric Friedman (Union Square Ventures)   

99.99% (Or It's Totally Going to Happen But Isn't Signed Yet)      

Until a contract is signed - it's not a done deal.


23. Mike Speiser (SutterHill Ventures)   

Better Incentives Can Improve Online Advertising       

Publishers should incentivize advertisers to create good content.  Brings up the idea of ad content that enhances, rather than diminishes, user experience.


24. Matt McCall (DFJ Portage Venture Partners)   

Do You Need to Be in the Valley?       

Addresses the age old question of whether entreprenuers in the tech space need to be in Silicon Valley to succeed.


25. Stu Phillips (Ridgelift Ventures)   

Venture Capital - Time for V3.0       

Stu Phillips raises an important point - VC2.0 which began with the Internet and resulting bubble - is out. A new system needs to be created.


26. Jason Caplain (Southern Capitol Ventures)   

Include Sales in your Strategy      

Entreprenuers need to connect with their buyers early on; sales is an integral part of EVERY company.


27. Jason Mendelson (Foundry Group)   

Senator Dodd - Making it harder for small businesses to get funded       

A VC outlook on the legislation changes proposed that will alter the ability for companies to get financed.


28. Nic Brisbourne (Esprit Capital Partners)   

Financial Forecasts in a Business Plan       

"Any business plan that has financial forecasts under year 1, year 2, etc. rather than 2009, 2010, etc. is too early stage for us." Brisbourne urges entrepreneurs to be precise in their projections and have a definitive timeline for revenue.


29. Albert Wenger (Union Square Ventures)   

Hiring: Lack of Diversity Becomes Self-reinforcing       

Historical hiring practices may affect the ability to bring on diverse, younger talent.


30. David B. Lerner (Totius Group, Columbia Venture Lab)

Getting from Zero to One in Your Startup: Founder Compensation Should be Slim to None       

An important point for every founder to konw - your investment is on the back end - not from annual salary.


31. Larry Cheng (Fidelity Ventures)   

Succeeding with a Potential Single Point of Failure       

Two success stories of companies who exited in spite of single point of failure possibilities.


32. Raj Kapoor (Mayfield Fund)   

Prediction: Social Nets Will Make More Money Off-site vs On-site their Websites       

Interesting take on how social networks will continue to monetize.


33. Will Price (Hummer Winblad)   

Now      

The importance of being present in the moment AND enjoying it.


34. Howard Morgan (First Round Capital)   

UNI- Acquired Tastes in Food and Investing      

Morgan talks about business plans that excite him as a potential user - not as an investor.


35. Mark Suster (GRP Partners)   

How to (re)Approach People (Advice on the Eve of LeWeb)       

"Business etiquette tips for dealing with VCs and Corporates at Conferences"


36. Christine Herron (First Round Capital)   

What's the Secret Success of Mint.com? The Real Numbers Behind Aaron Patzer's Growth Strategy     

How much does it take to get started? When should you raise money? Interview with Mint.com CEO opens up and answers these questions.


37. Fred Destin (Atlas Ventures)   

The Arrogant VC: A View from the Trenches (full length version)       

Destin posts the answers to "tell me why VCs are disliked by entrepreneurs"


38. Rob Day (@Ventures)   

Conventional Wisdom and Cleantech Venture Capital       

Day clears up what Cleantech is, and in which firms "Cleantech VCS" invest.


39. David Feinleib (Mohr Davidow Ventures)   

When You Are the Product       

A reminder that, regardless of the technology or device, when pitching investors you are pitching yourself.


40. Bijan Sabet (Spark Capital)   

Creating an Operating Plan for 2010       

Advice for any year really, on creating an operating plan that works.


41. Phillippe Botteri (Bessemer Venture Partners)   

Impact of the Recession on SaaS Sales & Marketing Productivity       

How has the recession affected SaaS? Not much.


42. Andrew Parker (Union Square Ventures)   

For-Pay Content       

How does Microsoft's Bing plan to compete? By paying customers not to compete.


43. Mark Peter Davis (DFJ Gotham Ventures)   

Bootstrapping vs. Venture Funding       

The pros and cons of two finance methods for startups.


44. Allen Morgan (Mayfield Fund)   

Co-Founders vs. Early Employees       

Quick thoughts on the differences between the co-founders and early employees.


45. James Chen (CXO Ventures)   

Don't Bite the Hand that Feeds       

This lesson applies to both business and government: Don't bite the hand that feeds you.


46. David Aronoff (Flybridge Capital Partners)   

Failure Modes       

Why do companies fail?


47. Max Bleyleben (Kennet Partners)   

The Hunt for Growth Is On       

Tech success is creeping into Europe and other markets as the US emerges from recession.


48. Jason Ball (Qualcomm Ventures Europe)   

Pitch your startup: VCIC 2009       

2009 awards have been given, but 2010 awards are just around the corner.


49. Don Rainey (Grotech Ventures)   

The 7 Troublemakers you meet in a Startup   

7 personality archetypes an entrepreneur can expect to meet when starting a company.


50. Peter Haas (Founder, AIDG)

In Social Enterprise, Force Yourself to be an Entrepreneur First       

Ten rules for starting an international service organization.

 


Looking for Funding? Go "Blind"


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This video reveals a common mistake entrepreneurs make when shopping for capital.

 

 



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