Growthink Blog

Jeff Bezos and Amazon's Success Secret


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Last month, author Brad Stone released an interesting book called, "The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon."

The book chronicles the story behind Jeff Bezos and Amazon, but there's really only one paragraph from it that I'd like to focus on herein. That paragraph reads as follows:

    "They [Amazon] would let other more experienced retailers sell everything on the site via Amazon's Marketplace, and Amazon would take a commission. Meanwhile the company [Amazon] could watch and learn. That was something we did quite well, says Randy Miller. If you don't know anything about the business, launch it through the Marketplace, bring retailers in, watch what they do and what they sell, understand it, and then get into it."


So, let me break this down for you if it's not apparent. Rather than selling items like apparel and kitchen items itself, Amazon launched these categories through the Amazon Marketplace where other vendors sold them.

In doing so, Amazon was able to see what products sold well and how they were sold. And then, when a product sold well, what did Amazon do? Well, they started selling the item themselves in the main Amazon.com site.

So, what is this strategy called?

Market Research. That's right, Amazon.com went from an online bookseller to the WalMart of the internet by doing market research. Because with the right market research you can avoid the missteps that most companies and entrepreneurs make.

So, what kind of market research will help you grow your company? Below are the key research areas you need:

Industry Research


In assessing your industry or market, start by defining how big it is. Why? Because if it's too small, it's probably not worth entering. Define your market as clearly as possible. For example, if you manufacture prosthetics, look at the size of that market, not the entire healthcare market.

Next look at market trends. For example if the market is shrinking or consolidating, it's probably not a great market to enter; unless you have a revolutionary new product that could shake things up.

Customer Research

Understanding your target customers is absolutely critical to your business' success. In fact, one of Jeff Bezos' hallmark strategies is "We start with the customer and work backward."

In your research, you need to precisely identify and define who your customer is. Define their demographics such as what gender they are, how old they are, where they live, etc. If a business customer, also define their role in their company and the type of company for which they work.

Then move to the psychographic questions. What do your customers like to do in their free time? Who do the like on Facebook? Etc.

The more you know your customers and what make them tick, the better job you will do in creating the products and services they want, and effectively marketing to them.

Competitive Research


Identify who you are top competitors are. Importantly, like Amazon did, determine what has worked well for them and what their customers are buying.

The old investor saying is very important here, which is as follows: "if you have no competitors; maybe you have no market." What this means is that if customers aren't currently buying a product or service that serves the need your company fulfills, then maybe that need and thus market doesn't exist.

The more you understand your competition, the better you will do in creating a winning strategy. Fortunately, with online tools, you can learn a lot about your competition. You can find out the demographics of their website visitors, what other sites those visitors frequent, what other companies they like on Facebook, and so on. Clearly this information will help improve your marketing and overall strategy.

Financial Research


The final category or research to conduct is financial research. Here the goal is to develop benchmarks. For example, what is the average Cost of Goods Sold in your industry? What percentage of your revenues should staffing costs comprise?

By understanding these benchmarks, you can do a better job in determining financing needs and also measuring and improving your performance over time.

We all know that knowledge is power. And when running a business, the knowledge you need is market research. With it you'll have a better strategy and your likelihood of success skyrockets. Without it, you're shooting in the dark. I prefer the former.

 

Suggested Resource: If your business plan and/or strategy is missing critical market research, you will fail. Or worse yet, if your plan or strategy is based on faulty research, you're doomed. Click here to learn how my team can quickly and affordably conduct your market research for you.


The Real Cost of Poor Strategy


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It is hard not to laugh when I hear tired old refrains like "Nobody reads business plans anymore" or "In the world of lean startups, there is no time for strategic planning."

Why do otherwise intelligent and well-meaning businesspeople say and think things like this?

Well, for starters as human beings we all struggle to emotionally grasp the impact of the history not made, of the things that don't happen.

You see, poor strategy does not manifest itself as much in high profile flame-outs as perhaps it did in days of yore (see Pets.com, eToys, etc.) as much as it does in nothing of note ever being accomplished.

As in companies that grow slowly, if at all.

And make no profits.

And are led by entrepreneurs whose talent and work ethic doesn’t translate into the kind of pay and lifestyle they seemingly deserve.

Missed opportunities, lost years, unrewarded work.

These are the real but hidden costs of poor strategy.

Now, the other big misconception around strategic plans is confusing the “form of deliverable” with the process itself.

Again, this is a case where otherwise smart and well-meaning businesspeople make an obvious, but critical error: They equate the plan with a physical document.

And when done poorly, more often than not a document that is only tangentially connected to the “real business” it supposedly represents.

Now, the good news is that the literature is filled with great best practices - tested over thousands of businesses - as to how to lead strategic planning processes that are connected to the actual marketing, sales, operations, and finances of a company.

Even better news: Inexpensive, effective, and everywhere accessible business software-as-services are connecting the dots between “big” strategy and the “small” to do’s, tactics and action items at the living, breathing heart of a business.

Software like Basecamp, Klipfolio, Crisply, Results.com, Posthaven, Chatter, Copytalk, Nudgemail, Evernote, Survey Monkey, MVPSocial, and dozens of others (especially the Growthink Dashboard).

This is where 21st Century strategy lives. How 21st Century businesses win.

Now, as for those who prefer to cling to their tired clichés, well I guess they can always reminisce about how things were back in the 20th Century.

But for those who need more than nostalgia to sustain them, there has never been a better time to get on the technologically win by doing strategy right.

 


The 5 Questions That Determine Your Business' Value


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The biggest aspiration of most entrepreneurs and business owners today is to grow and then sell their businesses. And why shouldn't it be? Selling your business creates more multi-millionaires than any other endeavor.

The key issue however is this: are you growing your business the right way, and are you focusing on the right things? You see, when it comes time for buyers to appraise the value of your business, they might find different things to be important than you do. And the last thing you want to do is focus your time developing aspects of your business that buyers don't value. Particularly when doing so forces you to neglect the things they do.

Below are five key questions that will determine your business' value. Answer them honestly. And then work to improve your position on each.

1. How replicable is your business?

When corporations consider buying a business, they make a "build" or "buy" decision. That is, they ask whether the time and money it would take to build a similar business from scratch is greater than the cost to buy the business from you now.

As such, the more unique and less replicable your business is, the better. So think about how replicable your business is. For example, could another company easily replicate your products or services? Could they easily hire and train a team as good as yours? Would it be simple for them to build a customer base like yours?

Answer these questions honestly and focus on building a profitable AND harder-to-replicate business going forward.

2. How easy will it be to run your business after acquisition?

Why do we pay a premium for a new automobile versus a used one? Because we know the new one doesn't have any problems. It hasn't gotten into any accidents. It doesn't have an oil leak, etc.

Similarly, acquirers will pay a premium for a business that is in great "running condition." Sure, every business will have its challenges, but a business that is simple to run, like a new car, will be highly valued.

So, let me ask you this: if you sold your business today and retired, would the new owner be able to easily run your business thereafter?

  • Do you have systems in place that enable your business to run consistently every day?
  •  
  • Are your employees trained to handle all key issues that arise?
  •  
  • Will your customers continue to buy from your company even though you're no longer a part of it?

Always think how your business will run after you're gone. And if currently it wouldn't run smoothly, take actions now so that it will.

3. How has your business performed financially?

Unless the majority of the value of your company is in unique and patented technologies, buyers will thoroughly review your financial performance.

Clearly, they want to see strong revenues and profits. And they want growing revenues and profits. If your revenues or profits are on the decline, many buyers will project that decline will continue, and thus significantly decrease the valuation of your business. Fortunately the opposite is true, so do whatever you can to have strong and growing revenues and profits.

4. How stable is your customer base?

Your customers are the lifeblood of your business. The revenues you generate from them pay the bills and ideally fund great profits.

As such, acquirers will scrutinize your customer base. And the most important question is how stable that base is. For example, do they expect 50% of your customers to leave after the acquisition? Or 25%? Or 10%? Or none?

Clearly, the more stable your customer base, the more attractive you are to an acquirer. In the ideal situation, you have signed contracts with customers so the acquirer has complete certainty they will be retained. If not, ideally your customers have gotten in the habit of buying your products or services, or have a solid preference for them, so their continued patronage is likely.

Likewise, having a diversified customer base, as opposed to just a few very large clients, helps. Because with fewer, larger customers, there's more risk that one will leave and take a large chunk of your revenues with them.

5. What are the odds of sustainable future growth?

When you combine the four questions above, much of what the acquirer is trying to answer is what your odds are for future growth.

For instance, if you have a stable customer base, your financials are strong and growing, your business is unique, and it will be easy to run your business post acquisition, then your odds for future growth are great and you will have tons of suitors.

And tons of suitors interested in buying your business means that they will bid the value up and up, so when you sell, you will get a great premium. Which is probably one of the reasons you started your business in the first place. So do this, and make it happen!

 

Suggested Resource: If you want to build a sellable business, watch this free presentation called "Million Dollar Exits: How to Build a Business You Can Sell For Millions of Dollars." It starts by explaining the 3 most dangerous trends facing entrepreneurs today. Click here for this must-know information.


Building Your Dream Team


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No great companies have just one employee. None. Which means that in order to grow your company, you need to build a great team.

In building your team, there are two equally important but distinct parts: recruiting great employees and expertly managing them so they perform at their best.

1. Recruiting Great Employees

Recruiting great employees requires you to: 1) determine who to hire, and 2) hire the right people.

Determining Who to Hire

In determining who to hire, you need to assess both what job functions you need now, and what functions you'll need in the future. This will help you find the right people.

Consider this example: you need someone right now to manage your marketing. So you hire a marketing manager. A year from now, your company is doing well and you hire four more people as part of your marketing team.

Now here's the question that arises: is the person you initially hired for the marketing position the right person to lead your marketing team? Sometimes they are, but often they aren't. Since performing in a role yourself is a very different job than managing a team.

So, the question you need to ask yourself when you initially hire the marketing person is this: should I hire someone simply to meet my short-term marketing goals, or should I hire someone that can fill my short-term goals and who could also manage and grow my marketing department. The latter hire will typically be more qualified, and more expensive, so making such a decision is important.

Another tip when determining who to hire is to conduct a return on investment (ROI) analysis on new positions. That is, what expected return, typically in terms of increased profits, will the business generate in return for hiring each new staff member. The less funding you have in your business, the more important this analysis becomes in choosing who to hire now.

Hiring the Right People

There is an old and important saying in management, "Hire slowly and fire quickly." You hire slowly since it's critical to get the right people in your organization. And you fire quickly, since bad employees can ruin the morale and productivity of your entire team.

The process of hiring the right employees starts with sourcing them. You can source or find employees from a wide range of places, from college job boards to posting classified ads. For each open position, think about the best places to find qualified prospects.

Once you find qualified prospects, the key is to weed through them to find the top performers. While interviewing prospective employees is key, remember that someone's interviewing skills are not as important as their on-the-job performance. That is, someone can be great during interviews, but not so great on the job.

To overcome this challenge, delve into the prospect's performance in their last jobs and, as much as possible, give them tests to see how they might perform in your company. With regards to tests you give them, treat their performance on them as their best possible work. While they can refine their skills with training, prospective employees generally give it their all on such a test. So, if they score mediocre, they are not a good prospect.


2. Expertly Managing Your Team

Your job as a manager doesn't stop once you've recruited a great team. Rather, you need to expertly manage them. We see this in sports all the time; one team has incredibly talented players, but they still don't win the championship.

Key to your company's performance is motivating and managing your employees so they work collectively as a team and are highly productive.

Among the many techniques for accomplishing this, here are two of my favorites:

1. Let Your Employees Set Goals for Themselves

Employees will perform much better when they've set their own goals, rather than goals being dictated for them. So, have each employee set goals. Then review those goals with them. As needed, persuade them to modify their goals to better align with company goals. Even when you do this, they will feel personally accountable for achieving their goals.

2. Conduct Performance Reviews

If you don't meet with employees and review their performance, they won't know whether they're doing a good job or not. So, meet with your employees periodically to discuss their performance versus their goals, detail what they are doing well at, and identifying areas for improvement and your suggestions to achieve such improvement.

Your Team Allows You to Win the Game

We all face competition in our businesses. And the difference between the winners and losers is often the quality of the teams.  Clearly, if your marketing manager is better than your competitors', and so is your sales team, your production team, etc., you're going to win every time. So, focus on building your dream team so you emerge victorious.

 

Suggested Resource: Building Your Dream Team is a comprehensive video program that takes you through the four phases of building an outstanding team, which are: 1. Building a Founding Team, 2. Determining Who to Hire, 3. Hiring Superstars, and 4. Expertly Managing Your Team. Click here to learn more.


Entrepreneurial America - NOT Shutdown


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Watching the disaster of a process that is the D.C. budget drama, I found myself with a curious reaction.

And maybe even a little bit of a selfish one.

It was, by golly, how happy I am that I get to work in this so dignifying world of business and free enterprise and not have to waste my precious life energy on such nonsense.

And then feeling a bit more generous, I felt happiness for the hundreds of millions if not now billions of people worldwide that are able to do likewise.

To work in or at a business, just a plain old simple business.

A restaurant.

A software development firm. A medical device company.

An accounting firm. A roofing company. An insurance agency.

A tanning salon. A yoga studio. A specialty retailer. A freight forwarding company.

Walmart. A donut shop.

Now don't get me wrong, government is important.

And that those that work in it often are mostly truly public servants and we should be thankful for their service.

And yes, our vexing public policy challenges require our attention and concern.

But it isn’t that important.

So much of the real action in this world of ours takes place in the micro.

In that wonderful world of business production.

The world of multi-billion dollar companies like Cisco utilizing information technology to accomplish the accounting miracle of closing their books each and every day.

The world of General Electric growing great managers and business leaders time and time again.
 
The world of amazing customer service at places like Zappos and how that service dedication translates to strong profits that fuel our world.

The world of that sumptuous donut fresh out of the oven.

The world where, with a click of a button on my phone, I can buy a mobile app that sends me my text messages as e-mails (but don't ask me why I want this).

The world where I order new leather seat covers for my car, from Greece, on Ebay, and at a fraction of the price of what the dealership is asking.

And oh yes, by doing so making a small dent in that nation's debt and fiscal crisis.

And it is the world of my own business’ unique processes and project tasks and how we will profit from this burgeoning new world of global service exports.

Yes, the real and meaningful action is in this amazing 21st century global world of ours of hundreds of millions of points and more of concentrated business production.

That creates for all of us, this transcendent potpourri, this never-ending buffet, of essential, helpful, frivolous, sometimes conspicuous, but so blessedly diversified consumption.

And you know what else? 

History has taught that the more folks focus on getting great at what they particularly produce, no matter how great and glamorous or small and prosaic it might be.

Well, it is by so doing that all of our fiscal cliff and other challenges as if by some magical hand just seem to take care of themselves.


Focus On Value Drivers To Get To A Big Payday


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The acquisition market continues to be very strong. In the 12 months ending August 31, 2013, $881.7 Billion was paid to acquire 9,499 US companies. This represents an 8.1% increase over the $815.9 Billion paid to acquire companies in the previous year.

Importantly, during this time, the average EBITDA multiple paid for Middle Market firms (companies valued between $1 million and $500 million) was 9.1. This means that if your company's EBITDA (earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization) were $2 million, that your company would sell for 9.1 times that or $18.2 million.

I'm telling you this important information because selling your company is the ultimate goal for most entrepreneurs, because it's how you achieve significant wealth.

Importantly, not all of the $881.7 Billion paid to buy these companies went to the founders of these companies. Some of it went to investors, employees, and others. But the entrepreneurs who founded them received by far the biggest chunk.

That's why 80%, a full 4 out of 5, of individuals with a net worth of $5 million or more (called "pentamillionaires") are entrepreneurs who started and sold their businesses.

Here are some acquisitions that have taken place in just the last few days:

  • Sega purchased Atlus, a gaming company, for $141 million

  • Xchanging, an outsourcing services company, acquired e-sourcing provider MarketMaker4 for $22 million

  • EnerSys, an industrial battery manufacturer, agreed to acquire Purcell Systems, an electronic equipment company, for $115 million

  • Intel purchased Indisys, an artificial intelligence technology for $26 million and Omek, a gesture-based interface company, for $40 million
  • Google acquired mobile startup Bump for over $30 million (exact amount not disclosed)


And the list keeps going.

Now importantly, I want you to understand why each of these companies was acquired for millions of dollars. Here's why: each of them developed the right value drivers.

You see, whenever a large company considers buying a smaller company, they make a "build or buy" decision. That is, they think, "how long and how much money will it take for us to build what that company has already built." And then, they compare that answer to the price at which they could buy the company.

And when the larger company realizes that buying the smaller company is less expensive (in terms of dollars and time savings), they buy it. And as you read above, they often buy it at a huge price.

Now, what value drivers do buyers want?

I have identified 21 different value drivers they want. Such as the following:

1. Customers: the more customers you have and the more valuable your customers are, the more acquirers will pay to buy your company.

2. Intellectual Property: the more intellectual property you have, such as patents, trademarks, copyrights, and trade secrets, the more your company is worth to acquirers.
 
3. Team/employees: the more talented and trained your team, the higher the price the acquirer will pay for you.

So, be sure to build your company with these value drivers in mind. When you figure out which of the 21 value drivers are most important to acquirers in your sector, and focus on building them, you'll soon get to a massive payday - a big acquisition of your company.


The 8 Things Angel Investors Want


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There are eight key things angel investors will look for when considering whether or not to fund your business. No, you don't have to satisfy all of these criteria. But the more of them you do, the better the chance they will say "yes" to your funding request.

#1: They Like You

Believe it or not, this is really important. No matter how good your venture is, if the investor doesn't like you, they generally won't fund you. So, build rapport with prospective investors and give them the respect they deserve.

#2: They Feel Good About the Venture's Genre

Even if the investors likes you and even if they think your company can be a huge success, they need to like what the venture is all about. For example, someone who hates politics will generally not fund the new political website you are launching. So, find investors who have an affinity for the type of venture you're launching/running.

#3 They Feel a Void


If an individual is an ultra-successful business person who is currently running multiple operations, they are generally not going to invest in more ventures. Since, they don't have a void; they have all the excitement in their daily life that they need. Conversely, a person who feels they might be "missing out on the action" will be more motivated to invest in you.

#4 They Feel There's Good ROI Potential

This is obviously important. Even if investors like you, the type of business, and they feel a void, they generally want to believe they will get a nice return on their investment if they fund you.

There are five sub-criteria to this, which get us to our sum of eight things angel investors want.

#4a: Scalability


Does your company have a strong potential to achieve significant annual revenues? In a truly scalable business, you can multiply your sales without having to greatly increase your resources. Scalable businesses grow more rapidly and can reach an exit (whereby the investor gets their return) faster.

#4b: High Barriers to Entry


Barriers to entry are those things that make it difficult for another firm to compete against you, such as patents or proprietary technology, a unique location, strategic partnerships, and long-term customer contracts.

The stronger and/or more barriers to entry you have, the more likely you are to succeed, and the higher expected ROI the investor has.

#4c: Worthy Management Team


Angels must believe in both the founders and the key operating personnel of your company. Because even the best idea will fail if the team isn't good enough.

#4d: Your Exit Strategy

Your "exit strategy" or method in which you will "exit" your business, is generally to sell it or go public, with the former being much more common. As such, it's good to think about your exit strategy early. Who might want to buy you in the future, and why?

Since angel investors can't realize their investment until you exit, be sure to prove to them that such an exit is viable.

#4e: The Right Price

Finally, angel investors will only invest when the price is right. If you price your equity too high, angels may not have the potential to reap significant enough returns and will not invest.

We see this on the show Shark Tank all the time. The entrepreneur says, for example, that for $400,000 they will give up 10% of their company. The sharks always laugh at percentages like this and say they will need at least 40% of the company or more for that dollar amount.

While the sharks are much more sophisticated, and shark-like, than your common angel investor, you need to price your equity fairly (give them a fair equity stake for their investment) if you want them to fund your venture.

Knowing these 8 things that angel investors want will help you identify and convince the right angels to fund your business!

For my complete game plan for raising funding from angel investors, check out our Angel Funding Formula.


Fed Easing: Three Winners


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The word from the Fed last week that it would continue with its quantitative easing - purchasing approximately $85 billion per month in U.S treasury bond and de facto continuing to expand the country’s money supply - signaled that that the era of extremely low interest rates will continue.

Predictably, stock markets worldwide cheered along with it being seen as a very positive signal for the well-recovering US housing market.

Now, as to what it means that the Fed has, since 2008, expanded the U.S. Money Supply almost 400% - from $800 billion in 2008 to over $3.5 trillion today?

Well, it doesn’t take a Nobel Prize in Economics to reliably predict the inevitable outcome…

Inflation.

Now, in spite of its strong negative connotations, an inflationary economy while extremely painful for very many, also offers opportunities to profit and win.

Here are three:

Winner Number One: Debtors. This is obvious, but easy to overlook. Those owing money at set interest rates - homeowners with 30 year fixed mortgages and companies issuing bonds - will benefit enormously as the inflation train rolls in.

Let’s look at a worst but not overly improbable case - a hyperinflation period where all prices rise 10X, resulting in a $500,000 home able to be credibly listed for $5 million.

It sounds crazy, but over the years in countries where hyperinflation has hit, this has not been an uncommon occurrence.

Now let’s say that home was financed (or refinanced) with a $400,000, 30-year mortgage at a fixed rate of 3.5%.

Well, with its price increasing from $500,000 to $5 million - while the amount owed on it remains fixed - all of a sudden the house’s equity to debt ratio skyrockets from 20% to 92%!

Winner Number Two: Companies with Pricing Power. Businesses with the ability to increase prices quickly without seeing sales plummet - think luxury goods and easily adjusted staples like gasoline at the pump - will hold significant advantages over businesses constrained by “stickier” prices.

Examples of the latter include services like mobile phones contracts and gym memberships, and the classic example of restaurants not increasing prices because of the cost of printing new menus.

Winner Number Three: Private Companies for Sale. My favorite, as there is no greater form of an entrepreneurial, economic success than a sale of a business at an attractive price.

In a world of rising prices, the acquisition appetites of larger companies increase as their cost of money - as driven by their valuation multiples - decrease.

This is most evident for public companies, now trading at a rich 18x earnings (S&P 500), who are able to buy smaller, usually private companies with the relatively cheap currency of high multiple public equity.

This frothiness also drives the financing environment, where buyers (investors) and sellers (entrepreneurs, companies seeking capital) more easily strike higher risk, higher valuation deals (see Fab.com, HootSuite, and scores of others) with an ease that isn’t there in a flat or deflationary environment.

So, if you're an entrepreneur, think about accelerating and intensifying both your financing and exit planning efforts.

And for investors, remember that the worst strategy in an era of rising prices is to be standing still and sliding away in fast depreciating cash.

P.S. Click here to complete our survey on investing and entrepreneurship and have a free cup of coffee on us!


Never Say This to a Child or Entrepreneur


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When my kids were younger, I recall one night when we were eating dinner. My kids were saying "I want this" and "I want that."

And then I said something that I immediately realized I should never tell my kids, or any entrepreneur for that matter.

What I said was this: "you know, money doesn't grow on trees."

Now, you may not think saying this is so bad. So, let me explain.

The reason why I said this was to show my kids the value of money. And that we have to work to make money to spend on the things we want.

But here's the negative: saying this paints the wrong picture. It paints the picture that we can't always get what we want. Which is the exact opposite of the attitude I want my kids, and all entrepreneurs, to have.

What my kids and all entrepreneurs MUST be thinking is YES, I CAN get whatever I want. Yes, it won't just come to me, but with hard work and ingenuity, I can and I will get what I want.

Fortunately, right after I said that to my kids, I caught myself.

One of the reasons I caught myself was from the interview I did a while back with Ken Lodi, the author of "The Bamboo Principle."

In the interview, Ken explained that timber bamboo shoots grow very little for four years while their extensive root system is growing and taking hold. But once the roots are firmly in place, the bamboo can grow a shocking 80 feet in just six weeks.

This story made me realize that money does in fact grow on trees. The key is to work on the tree's roots. To build such a strong foundation that generating money becomes easy.

Every great company has a strong foundation. They create a brand name, sales systems, delivery systems, etc. And then, they can generate cash and profits each and every day.

So, focus on building an extremely strong foundation. Think through your business model. Learn the best practices for each of the key business disciplines - marketing, HR, finance, sales, etc. And then, put your thinking into a strategic plan.

Your strategic plan is your roadmap to success. It is the tool that turns your ideas into reality. For example, the great marketing idea in your head isn't going to become reality unless it's documented in your plan and a team member(s) knows to execute on it. Likewise, your new products and services won't be built or fulfilled unless they are documented and your team knows what to do. Get your ideas in your strategic plan and then you build the tree from which money does grow.

So, never let anyone tell you that "money doesn't grow on trees" or that you can't have everything you want. Because money does grow on firmly-rooted trees and you CAN achieve and get everything you want out of life if you resolve to do so. They key is to build your plan -- your foundation -- and then grow systematically from there.


Private Equity and Your IRA: The Pathway to Tax-Advantaged Returns


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Individual Retirement Accounts, or IRAs, in all their forms - traditional, Roth, 401k, Defined Contribution, Simple, SEP, 403(b) and 457, have become increasingly popular vehicles for private equity investing.

For the individual investor, investing in private equity via a "Self-directed" IRA has a number of key advantages:

First and foremost are tax savings - both at the time of investment and as the investment appreciates.  In some circumstances - for pre-tax contributions via a SEP-IRA for example - up to $49,000 can be invested on a pre-tax (i.e. tax deductible) basis.

Secondly, the power of tax - free compounding of interest, dividends, and capital gains - via both traditional pre-tax IRAs as well as the increasingly popular (and increasingly tax-advantaged) post-tax Roth IRAs is enormous.

In high-return and payout scenarios, where there are larger cash dividends and/or capital gains paid on an annual basis, the value of tax free compounding can lead up to a doubling of total investment return when compared to taxed compounding.

And thirdly, investing in private equity via an IRA addresses "de facto" arguably the key negative of private equity investing - its illiquidity.  This is because, to encourage a long-term, retirement-focused time horizon, under the IRA umbrella there are significant, structured penalties for early withdrawl.

In short, IRAs are ideally designed to house long-term investment assets with high capital appreciation potential.  This is, of course, the core objective of almost all private equity investing.

 


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"Old-School Leadership
is DEAD"

"Barking orders" and other forms of intimidating followers to get things done just doesn't work any more. So how do you lead your company to success in the 21st century?

CLICK HERE
to watch the video.

Blog Authors

Jay Turo

Dave Lavinsky