Growthink Blog

[Webinar] Opportunities in Healthcare IT


You’re invited to attend a webinar on Tuesday, April 16th at 1pm Eastern / 10am Pacific about opportunities in the Healthcare Information Technology sector.

To register, click here.

Why Attend?

Over $200 billion MORE was spent on healthcare in 2012 than in 2011.

Let's put that number in perspective - the increase in healthcare spending last year was greater than the revenues of Microsoft, Cisco, Google, and Apple.


And with the Affordable Care Act slowly but surely becoming the law of the land and the Baby Boomer generation retiring and hitting their “peak” healthcare spending years, there is no end in sight to the growth.

You Can Cry About It or You Can Seek Opportunities In It

While out-of-control healthcare costs and bureaucratic systems remain one of our most vexing societal challenges, private sector entrepreneurs are moving fast and smart to address various aspects of the problem.

And are building dynamic growth companies while so doing.

Healthcare Information Technology – A $30 Billion Business

Healthcare Information Technology (HIT) is one of the great and growing bright spots in the U.S. economy – it’s a $30 billion+ a year industry growing at over 14%/year.

It is comprised of big sectors:

• Practice Management Systems (PMS) - a $4 billion/year business growing at 11%/year
• Electronic Health Records (EHR) - a $1.5 billion/year business growing at 22%/year
• Revenue Cycle Management (RCM) - a $1 billion /year business growing at 15%/year
• And last but certainly not least - Transcription, Billing, and IT services, clocking in at $24 billion/year and growing at 12%/year

Within each of these sectors are dozens of under-the-radar companies experiencing strong revenue and profitability growth, developing dynamic and cost-saving technological innovations, and are being courted by financial and strategic acquirers. 

Companies like Castlight Health, Practice Fusion, Kissner Software, and Strategic Solutions Management.  

Meet An Industry Leader

I would like to invite you to an exclusive opportunity to meet, via web conference, the principals of one of the most innovative medical billing companies in the country. 

Combined, they have over 40 years of experience in successfully overcoming and profiting from some of the most vexing challenges in medical billing and information technology, and are well-versed on the regulatory and technological changes sweeping the industry.

On the web conference, they will share:

• Who the winners and losers will be when the brave new world of the Affordable Care Act meets the cloud computing and Big Data revolutions

• Why practice areas like obstetrics, surgery, and podiatry are in a unique period of change and consolidation

• How the “dream” of combining billing, practice management, and electronic health records systems into turnkey platform is in fact becoming a reality

• How the emerging world of mHealth – the use of iPads and tablets and mobile devices to deliver care - is and is not transforming modern medicine

• And much, much more

Limited Attendance

To preserve the intimacy of the presentation, we are limiting the web conference to the first 35 registrants.

So sign up right away to attend via the link below:

Best regards, and look forward to connecting. 

Zig's Simple Technique for Building a Great Company


If you're not familiar with Zig Ziglar, he was a well-known author, master salesman, and motivational speaker. Unfortunately Zig passed away last November. I apologize for taking so long to honor him with this essay, in which I tell my favorite Zig Ziglar story.

In Zig's early years as a salesman, he visited peoples' homes, making presentations to sell them high-quality cookware.

He had a competent assistant at the time who helped him keep track of appointments and handled administrative duties. One week, however, Zig realized he had two appointments scheduled for the same time. Not waiting to cancel any appointments he asked his assistant to cover one of the appointments for him.

She was terrified.  She did not want to do it and he wasn't going to make her!

Being the consummate salesman that he was, Zig eventually got her to calm down.  Then he assured her that she knew the presentation as well as he did, and that she would do great.  After he solemnly promised to never ask her to do a presentation again, she agreed to cover the appointment just that one time. 

Zig recounts that at the end of the evening, she was convinced she had fumbled half the presentation. But, to her surprise and delight, the clients ordered quite a bit of cookware.  Most surprising, is that when she got over her nerves, she found she rather enjoyed the experience. 

His timid and sales-panicked assistant evolved into a top notch salesperson, was his right hand partner for many years, and years later (with his delighted consent) became a highly-sought out and respected sales trainer for a leading cosmetic company.

Zig shared this story to show human potential.  He puts all the praise on her and generously applauds her for her accomplishments.  While I am inspired by her transformation, I want to focus on his role in her transformation because I believe that was Zig's greatest gift to the business world.  Yes, his sales training is worth bars of gold, but ultimately what really made him a success was his ability to develop others.

He could have made millions as a star salesperson.  He could have kept his philosophy, his techniques, and his secrets to success all to himself.  Instead, he made hundreds of millions by sincerely applying himself to improving everyone around him who was willing to listen.

Zig Ziglar was a true leader.

Yes, he sold books, and videos, made speeches, and made money, but he invested in people.  He believed that the success of a company was largely dependent on the quality of their sales force, and the quality of their sales force was solely dependent on how much that force really cared about helping people.

And, a sales force isn't going to care about helping anyone if they don't feel that their company cares about them. 

Zig could have benched his assistant, sent her right back to her phone and typewriter after she covered that one appointment.  Instead, he nurtured her potential and encouraged her to continue developing her sales skills.  Now think about this, how much more money did Zig make by having her on his team at her full potential instead of at her lowest potential? 

How much more money will your company generate if you make the time to develop your team to their full potential? Beyond just money, how much loyalty will you cultivate? Will you feel more confident about your future success when you have a top-notch team you can trust?  How many talented people will want to work for you when the word gets out about your leadership?

Yes, it takes time and energy, yet Zig demonstrated over and over that when you invest in helping someone be the best version of themselves possible, the rewards, material and otherwise, greatly outweigh the sacrifice.

Zig Ziglar died in November of 2012.  He left behind dozens of books, thousands of hours of video and audio, and most of all, he left behind millions of grateful professionals whose lives were touched and even changed by the empowering lessons he left behind.  His message that you could accomplish more in life and in business through caring and investing in the success of others is a timeless gem that lives on.

As he once said, "You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want."

Rest in peace Zig.  We'll miss you. And for all of you listening, develop your employees and customers, and everyone around you, to their full potential, and you will achieve incredible success!

5 Techniques to Scare Competitors Out of the Market


On many levels, competition is good.

For example, when you start a business, you want there to be competition. Since if there was no competition, there may not be a market or customers who want to buy what you are selling.

And once in business, competition is generally good since it forces your company to get better. It forces you to better satisfy customers (or they will choose your competitors) and it forces you to become more efficient (so you reap more profits even if you have offer more competitive pricing).

Now, while competition does provide these advantages, you clearly want to have less competition, and you'd like for fewer new competitors to enter the market. In doing so, you'll enjoy more of a monopoly in your market, which means more customers and more profits.

The best way to knock competitors out of your market and discourage new entrants is to build "business assets" that your competitors don't have. (I define "business assets" as resources you build now that will give you and your company future economic value.)

Here are five examples of business assets you can build:

1. Customers: Most mobile phone companies offer 2 year service contracts that all new customers must sign (and face penalties if they leave before the two years are up). This essentially "locks up" customers making it harder for new entrants (or existing entrants) to come in the market and take their customers. Customer agreements and contracts are one of the most powerful business assets you can build.

2. Systems: Most franchise organizations (e.g., Subway, McDonalds, etc.) have made significant investments in systems in areas such as taking orders, producing products, handling customer complaints, etc. These systems make it easier and less expensive to hire and train employees and better service customers. This makes it harder for others to compete against them. Likewise, I know many companies who have built customized software systems that allow them to perform faster, cheaper, and more consistently than their competitors.

3. PPE (Plant, Property and Equipment): When I was a teenager, I made a lot of money shoveling snow. I used that money to buy a snow blowing machine. Equipped with the snow blowing machine, I was able to remove snow ten times faster than my competitors. This allowed me to dominate my local market.

4. Product or Service Variations: A local pizza shop promotes itself as having 36 varieties of pizza. Offering this large variety makes it harder for new pizza companies to enter the market. Because a new company would have a very hard time creating 36 varieties from the start, it would be harder for them to satisfy customers.

5. Exclusive Partnerships: Creating exclusive partnerships could be a key business asset that gives you competitive advantage. For example, if you create exclusive partnerships with top organizations in your industry, they would only work with you and not your competitors. For example, let's say you and a competitor both serve the senior market. But you have an exclusive relationship with the AARP whereby they only promote you, and not your competitors. With 37 million senior members, your AARP relationship would give you considerable advantage.

What I want you to consider now is how you can build business assets that "unlevel the playing field." How can you make it so that nobody wants to compete against you?

  • Can you lock-up customers with agreements and contracts?

  • Can you build new systems to make your company more effective and efficient?

  • Can you make investments in plant, property and equipment that allow you to cut costs or increase output?

  • Can you develop new product and/or service options that better serve customer needs?

  • Can you form exclusive partnerships to help you gain new customers that your competitors can't?

Importantly, whatever answers you come up with, realize that building these business assets will take time. Often times they may take as much as a year (or even longer). And also realize that short-term profits may go down when you are building them. For example, in the AARP example above, forging such a relationship could take 6-months, during which you invest lots of time and generate no incremental revenue.

But, once the asset is built, you may profit (and profit big) for years.

So make sure to properly plan and prioritize the development of your business assets, even though they often have less short-term benefits than other activities (such as setting up a new advertising campaign).

Set a long-term goal for when you want the assets built. And make sure that you build time into your daily, weekly and monthly schedules to move the development forward. Doing so will dramatically improve your revenues and profits, and at the dismay of your competitors who will be forced to go elsewhere.

Big Media, Big Government, Big Business, Big Problems


Depending on how you slice it, this is either a golden or a leaden business age.

It is a golden age, as never before in human history has there been so much access to great opportunities as there are right now.

Crowdfunding, private equity and debt secondary markets like Second Market and SharesPost, peer-to-peer lending sites like and Lending Club, and the Big Three social networking giants - Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter - have made information and intelligence on, and access to opportunities better and greater than ever before.

Yet, the overall spirit and mindset of business is anything but golden.

Huge and historically unprecedented public sector debt and social safety net obligations in the United States and Europe - layered on an overlapping and inter-connected global banking system cast a pale “macro” of systemic risk over the markets.

Compounding matters, never before has the drumbeat of news and information been louder, mostly shrilling that the financial sky could fall at a moment’s notice.

The overall effect of this both real and perceived angst is a “crowding out” of all of the good stuff that is happening out there.  

So what should the growth-seeking, yet sober executive and / or investor do?

Well, first and foremost, get one’s mind and spirit right

And the best way to accomplish that is to focus on what author Matt Ridley so eloquently describes as what has been since the dawn of Man the guidepost to our better future.


Entrepreneurship lives and grows in the “micro” - in sectors and niches within the overall economy either protected from or aided by the larger current.

And entrepreneurship is the antithesis of sclerotic, bureaucratic, and beyond human scale organizations (see Big Media, Big Government, Big Business) of such complexity and inertia that the application of individual motive force them to far more often than not is ineffective, no matter how good the intention.

Rather, entrepreneurship is undertaken via that finest form of collaboration known to history - small, impassioned teams driving toward an idealistic vision and mission.

To sell some thing or some service of a type, or in a way, or at a price that has never been done before.

And to make money doing it.

And the really good news is that there are more entrepreneurs - far, far more - hundreds of millions worldwide striving to have their brilliance and creations expressed and realized, and to make their futures their own.

And in their multitude, in their collective uniqueness, they are the hope and the light of the world.

Back them.

Even better, be one of them.

In mindset, in spirit, and in appetite for change and risk and daring.

You’ll feel a lot better. 

The Secret to Highly Effective Marketing


In this article, I'm going to give you the secret to highly effective marketing.

Let me start with an example.

Let's say your competitor runs an advertisement that reaches 10,000 target customers and gets these results.

  • 1 percent response rate (response rate means that prospective customer visited competitor's website, went into their store, called them, etc.)
  • 35 percent conversion rate (conversion rate means the responding customer then purchases)
  • $500 price per widget (widget being the item sold by your competitor)
  • 1.5 widgets per buyer (average buyer purchases 1.5 widgets in initial order)
  • 30 percent profit margin
  • 10 percent repurchase rate (10% of customers buy from your competitor again)

Assuming the ad reached 10,000 target customers, your competitor's gross profit from the ad would have been $8,662.50 (minus the cost of the ad).

Now let's assume that your company did a 20 percent better job on each of these factors. Your results would be as follows:

  • 1.2 percent response rate
  • 42 percent conversion rate
  • $500 price per widget
  • 1.8 widgets per buyer
  • 36 percent profit margin
  • 12 percent repurchase rate

Now let's look at the results.

If your ad reached the same 10,000 target customers, your gross profit would be $19,596.

That's 2.3 times greater than your competitor's.

Now, what would happen if you generated 2.3 times greater profits than your competitors every time you ran an ad?

The answer is that you would absolutely dominate them.

Now, the key marketing secret that I'm sharing with you here is that you don't have to revolutionize your marketing system. Rather, small, 20% improvements in each part of your system lead to revolutionary results.

So, here are some ways in which you can improve each part of your marketing system:

Response Rate

The more you know about your customers' wants and needs, the more easily you can design advertisements that appeals to them.

And the more you know about them, the better you could craft a unique selling proposition (USP) to attract them.

For example, if you are local hardware company and you know your typical buyer is a busy male with a wife, kids, and dog, you could easily craft ads with a higher response rate.

You could also boost response rates by developing better offers that attract customers, such as an offer for a 90-day money-back guarantee.

Conversion Rate

Remember, conversion rates are the percentage of prospective customers that you converted into actual customers.

A few ways you could increase conversion rates include having a better process in place for training your staff and sales team, providing better employee incentives (e.g., commissions or bonuses for closing sales), or by developing and testing sales scripts that boost results.

Number of Widgets Per Buyer

To increase the number of units purchased per transition (including purchasing more widgets or related items), you can rely on similar tactics to increasing conversion rates such as better hiring, training, sales scripts and so on.

Remember McDonalds doubled its profits when it started asking "would you like fries with that?" and increased them again when it starting asking "would you like to supersize that?"

Profit Margins

Better systematizing your business and implementing the right processes and procedures will allow you to generate higher profits per sale than your competitors.

Repurchase Rate

Finally, to increase repurchase rates, do a better job of communicating with your clients and showing them how special they are. For example, send them emails, call them, or send them letters in the mail to educate them and remind them that you have products and services that can help them.

As you just witnessed, making small improvements to each part of your marketing system is incredible powerful and massively increases your profits. If you want to learn more, check out our "Double Your Profits" program which provides detailed training on how to make these improvements in your business.

3 Little Known Reasons Why Angel Investors Fund Entrepreneurs


When most entrepreneurs start out and realized they need funding, they are typically presented with three options.

The first is debt financing, which is typically in the form of a loan from a bank.

The other two funding options are typically in the form of equity, and they are 1) equity from individual or "angel" investors and 2) equity from venture capitalists.

Importantly, when considering these two sources of funding it is important to understand that most venture capitalists will not invest in companies that have not achieved "proof of concept" (which generally means a working prototype and/or revenues). Also, venture capitalists generally only invest in companies that have the potential to be valued at over $100 million within five years.

These criteria make venture capital inaccessible to most entrepreneurs. Furthermore, angel funding is often a better option since it is much easier to attain.

Consider these statistics:

  • In an average year (according to the Center for Venture Research at the University of New Hampshire), 250,000 angel investors will fund 60,000 companies, giving them $20 Billion in total.

  • Conversely, in and average year (according to the National Venture Capital Association), there are only 800 active venture capital firms, who fund only 4,000 companies, also giving them $20 Billion in total.

So while venture capitalists write much larger checks, 15 times more entrepreneurs raise funding from angels.

So why do angel investors fund entrepreneurs?  The common answer is that they hope to get a solid return on their investment. Obviously, investing at the earliest stages for a company that eventually goes big can earn the investor 100X their money back or more.

However, there are three lesser known, but equally important reasons, why angel investors fund entrepreneurs:

1. They know, like and trust the entrepreneur. Like with friends and family investments, sometimes angels know and trust the entrepreneurs and want to help them succeed.

2. They feel they can add real value. Many angels have lots of relevant experience that can help the companies they fund, from experience hiring staff to connections with key potential customers or suppliers. If angels can see their involvement adding a lot of value to the company, they might be very interested in investing.

3. Sometimes the angel wants or likes the action. Simply put, angel investing is exciting. It is generally a higher risk/higher reward version of the public stock markets requiring a more entrepreneurial analysis which is highly intriguing. This is particularly the case when the angel investor is a retired entrepreneur or executive.

So, if you are an entrepreneur seeking funding, keep these motivations in mind when you identify, approach and speak with angels.

Because understanding them is often the difference between whether you will raise money or not. Finding angel investors is also easy if you know where to look.

Is This The Secret to Entrepreneurial Success?


Today's article was written by my son, Max.  Max is 12 years old. I did not edit the article at all. He wrote it for his seventh grade English class.

I personally was inspired by his article. And it made me think about you and all the other entrepreneurs I strive to help succeed. As entrepreneurs, we will experience countless ups and downs. And throughout this process, we need to stay optimistic and have a positive attitude. And we need to enjoy the journey as much as the destination we hope to achieve. Maybe Max has the answer to this.



"This I Believe"

by Max Lavinsky


"LIVE FROM NEW YORK... ITS SATURDAY NIGHT!" The jazz music starts blaring, and I'm in New York City surrounded by mobs of people, walking briskly to where they need to go. I see the faces of hilarious comedians like Bill Hader and Jay Pharaoh. I feel like I'm living in a carefree world. I believe in Saturday Night Live. It can teach us more meaningful lessons than you would expect.

As a young child I had always heard from my parents about this hilarious show called "Saturday Night Live." I can remember being shown little clips of skits from time to time. I instantly fell in love with them. I dreamed of the day when I could watch a full episode, or go into New York City to see a show live. This first time I was able to fulfill this dream, I was in the fifth grade. I had a fever, and I was home from school. I was going in and out of sleep when my mom came in and told me that I could watch something. I turned on the TV and came across Saturday Night Live. Without any hesitation, I turned it on and started watching. Jim Carey was hosting, and in my opinion he is one of the funniest actors ever. In the next hour, I laughed more than I normally would in a month. I forgot about all of my pain. It was crude and offensive, but I couldn't seem to wipe the smile off of my face. After the show ended, I wanted to keep watching.. I had to turn it off of course, but I knew I had just found something I loved.

After having watched Saturday Night Live, I look at everything a little bit differently. The glass is always half full. There is always a little bit of sun peeking out between the clouds. Now, I tend to laugh more. It has also taught me deeper and more important lessons, though. Saturday Night Live can be racist, bias, use terrible stereotypes, and just be flat out horrible. While this is certainly a bad thing, there is some good. It teaches us to laugh at ourselves, and to be able to deal with getting made fun of. This is a skill that many people lack, and it makes them uptight, and without a full sense of humor. If everyone was able to laugh at themselves, maybe nobody would fight. Maybe, we could all live in peace. Maybe, if we could just do something as simple as laugh at ourselves, our world could be perfect. To think that Saturday Night Live could make a perfect world may sound outrageous, but it is not. Things as little as a TV show can change us. To some people that seems irrelevant, and it did to me once. But that of course, was before I watched Saturday Night Live.

So Saturday Night Live definitely has its cons. But while it embarrasses and offends us, it teaches us how laugh at ourselves. Will Ferrell once called Saturday Night Live a "comedy boot camp" because it teaches us how to have a sense of humor and appreciate comedy. So try something new. Watch Saturday Night Live and laugh.

4 Emails That Get An Investor's Attention


If you were raising funding 25 years ago, you probably called prospective investors on the phone and sent them your business plan via fax or overnight delivery.

As you can imagine, things are very different today. And email is the number one way to communicate with prospective investors, particularly professional investors like venture capitalist.

The challenge, as you can imagine, is getting their attention. As most venture capitalists receive tons and tons of unsolicited email each day. So, the key is having a great subject line on your email to get them to open it.

Before giving you some subject lines that do work, let me tell you ones that don't. Subject lines such as "Unique Investment Opportunity," "Please Invest in our company," and "Great Investment Opportunity" don't catch investors' attention and turn them off.

So, don't use these. Here are some you can use:

1. Your Involvement in XYZ Company

Where XYZ company is a company that the investor has funded and which is in your general space. You would start the email with something such as "based on your investment in XYZ company, I think you will be interested in what we are doing..."

2. New in the "XYZ Space"

Where XYZ is the "space" in which you are operating in (e.g., the financial software space). The first line would tie the subject line to what you are doing.

3. Referred by XYZ

Where XYZ is a referral source that knows both you and the investor. This works extremely well, but clearly you must first get the referral.

Because referrals are so powerful, go on LinkedIn and/or other networks to see if you already have someone in your network that can refer you to the investor.

4. Comment on Your Post About XYZ

Where XYZ is a blog post that the investor recently wrote about a subject. In your opening line you explain what you agree with in their post and then tie it to your company.

Importantly, after your subject line and introductory line that ties your company with the subject line, you should NOT tell the investor everything about your company.

Rather, this first email should be a "teaser" email. A "teaser" email is an email that "teases" the investor by giving them a bite-sized amount of compelling information about your company.

The goal of the email is to see if they are interested. If they are, you will follow up with more information (maybe your Executive Summary and/or full business plan) with the goal of getting a face-to-face meeting with the investor.

There are two reasons you shouldn't send your business plan in your initial email. First, you don't want to "over-shop" your deal. Over-shopping is letting too many investors know about your company. If too many investors know about you, the law of numbers states that many investors will pass on investing in you (remember, most investors passed on the opportunity to invest in Google years ago).

So, if an investor isn't even interested in your market space or teaser email, they certainly won't invest in your company. And here's what can happen -- an interested investor asks this investor (the one who isn't interested in your space) if they've heard of your company. That investor says "yes" (since you unwittingly sent them your plan) and that they weren't interested. And then their disinterest dissuades the once interest investor from investing in you.

The second reason you don't want to send out your business plan in your initial email is for confidentiality reasons. You just don't want your business plan out there for everyone to see. Rather, wait until the investor shows that they are at least somewhat interested in your venture before sending it.

So, now that you know that you should start by sending investors a "teaser" email, the question is what to include in the teaser.

Here's the answer: the teaser email should include 5 to 6 bullets about your company and should be very short (200 words or less).  The goal, once again is simply to create a general interest in your venture so the investor commits time and energy to learning more about it (by requesting additional documents or setting up a meeting).

Your bullets should describe what space your company is in and credentials that make you uniquely qualified to succeed (e.g., credentials of management team, customers serving already or showing interest, etc.).

To summarize, send investors a teaser email instead of your business plan to start. And realizing that they receive hundreds of emails every day asking for funding, make sure your subject line stands out and seems like you're offering them value.

The 5 Most Common Funding Sources


If you want to be successful in business, it is crucial to determine when, where, and how to obtain the funds you need. Whether you need $1,000 or $1 million to start or expand your business, if you can't raise this money, you can't build the business you want.

Before You Look For Funding

Before you look for funding, you need to create your business plan. In addition to explaining your business and your strategy for success, your plan must determine how much money you need and for what it will be used.

Also, it's very important for you to understand the timing of the funding. For example, do you need all the funding now (e.g., to build out a location), or can you receive your funding in stages or "tranches."

The amount of funding you seek will effect the source of funding you approach. For example, if you require $250,000 in funding, angel investors are more applicable then venture capitalists. If you need $5 million, the opposite is true.

While I have identified 41 sources of funding for your business, below are the 5 most common.

The 5 Most Common Types of Funding

1. Funding from Personal Savings

Funding from personal savings is the most common type of funding for businesses. The two issues with this type of funding are 1) how much personal savings you have and 2) how much personal savings are you willing to risk.

In many cases, entrepreneurs and business owners prefer OPM, or "other people's money." The four funding sources below are all OPM sources.

2. Debt Financing

Debt financing is a fancy way of saying "loan." In debt financing, the lender (often a bank) gives you funding that you must repay over time with interest.

You must prove to the lender that the likelihood of you paying back the loan is high, and meet any requirements they have (e.g., having collateral in some cases).  With debt financing, you do not need to give up equity. However, once again, you will have to pay back the principal and interest.

3. Friends & Family

A big source of funding for entrepreneurs is friends and family. Friends and family members can provide funding in the form of debt (you must pay it back), equity (they get shares in your company), or even a hybrid (e.g., a royalty whereby they get paid back via a percentage of your sales).

Friends and family are a great source of funding since they generally trust you and are easier to convince than strangers. However, there is the risk of losing their money. And you must consider how your relationship with them might suffer if this happens.

4. Angel Investors

Angel Investors are individuals like friends and family members; you just don't know them (yet).  At present, there are about 250,000 private angel investors in the United States that fund more than 30,000 small businesses each year.

Most of these angel investors are not members of angel groups. Rather they are business owners, executives and/or other successful individuals that have the means and ability to fund deals that are presented to them and which they find interesting.

Networking is a great way to find these angel investors.

5. Venture Capitalists (VCs)

VC funding is a suitable option for businesses that are beyond the startup period, as well as those who need a larger amount of capital for expansion and increasing market share. Venture capitalists are usually more involved with business management, and they play a significant role in setting milestones, targets, and giving advice on how to ensure greater success.

Venture capitalists invest in companies and businesses they believe are likely to go public or be sold for a massive profit in the future. Specifically, they want to fund companies that have the ability to be valued at $100 million or more within five years. They also go through an expensive and lengthy process of deciding on the best business to invest their money. Hence, the approval process usually takes several months.

Bottom Line

As you search for the best funding source for your business, you will discover that some financing options are complicated while others may offer a very small amount.

Choosing an inappropriate type of funding can lead to unfavorable outcomes such as feuds between the lender and business owner, shift of control, waste of resources and other negative consequences.

With this in mind, you should study the benefits and drawbacks of each financing option and select the ideal one that will help you meet your business goals. Because with the right source(s) of money, the sky is the limit for your business.

Education from the Inside Out


When it comes to education, this 21st century of ours is truly both the best and the worst of times.

It is the best of times as never before in human history has more information, more ways of learning, more access to best practices, been available to more people -- regardless of socio-economic condition and geography -- than it is today.

And, with 3 billion more people in the next 10 years coming online and joining the global information exchange, this remarkable and so very inspirational trend will only accelerate and grow.

Now, as anyone that has ever despaired over a never emptying e-mail inbox, over ever distracting and focus eroding text messages, over the always-growing mountain of things to read, listen, and watch, it can quite often feel like the worst of times too.

Yes, it is fair to say that the net sum of human information has grown far faster than that of human wisdom, satisfaction, and even happiness.

Now, the first and obvious point here is that this very well could be simply a distortion of relative versus absolute perception. 

For these days, NOTHING grows like information - with every three weeks the aggregate total added to it being greater than that accumulated from the beginning of recorded time through the year 2000

So, of course, the growth of everything/anything else will pale in comparison.

Now, once we recognize this, we should also see that as this mountain of information has grown, so has grown access to and consumption of the world's greatest art, literature, and music.

Which does make us, collectively, far wiser than ever.

And with the percentage of the world's population living in poverty at its lowest level in human history, our collective satisfaction, as measured by freedom from hunger, from premature death, and by access to choice as to one's work, one's mate, one's place to live, is both very good and increasing as well.

And with being wiser and more satisfied, yes we are collectively much happier, too.

This is all well and good, but far more exciting is that we have only begun to scratch the surface of how this “always-on” Internet world of ours might transform for the better our inner lives as it has our external ones.

How this might come to be came into focus for me through a conversation with the President of one of California's most admired colleges of graduate education.

In the process of helping to develop a five year strategic plan for the school, the President and I were discussing the relative merit of enrollment growth of online versus traditional on-campus enrollment.

As we were getting pretty granular into the various modeling approaches and ways to assign value to a “virtual” versus an in-person student, I stopped and noticed a certain pause and quiet in the room.

I looked up, and in the President’s eyes was a faraway look.

He paused, and then quietly said, “values-based education cannot be measured, it just is.”

He then took a sip of water, and more loudly added, “and it is only from this place do we measure our outcomes, not the other way around.”

This inside out approach is where technology can and will lead us. 

It will be a slow and bumpy, but very much an upwardly sloping road, towards all of us being truly well educated - online.

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