What a Data-Driven Strategic Plan Looks Like and How to Get One


 

Last week, in Austin I had the opportunity to participate in a 2 - day “Mastermind-type” meeting with a gathering of technology and Internet entrepreneurs and executives from around the globe.

It was an impressive group - leaders of companies with average sales of $8 million and competing and prospering in industries that run the gamut - from consumer products, to healthcare IT, to energy and entertainment, to mobile apps and wearable technologies, to real estate, and more.

To those who have never participated in a business mastermind, you don’t know what you’re missing! Originally conceived by legendary personal development guru Napoleon Hill, a Mastermind is a gathering of like-minded professionals that meet regularly and over time develop a productive, high-trust dynamic through which to attain breakthroughs of insight and accountability around and about strategic, tactical, and management challenges.

Mastermind groups, both generic ones as I attended in Austin, branded versions like Vistage and YPO, and informal versions as organized by trained facilitators, are where the hard, methodical work of entrepreneurial business - building and growth gets done.

The “table topic” for our meeting was best practices as to data-driven decision making and strategic planning.

It is obviously a very timely one - as Big Data and Business Intelligence (BI) tools and software are at the center of vast swaths of venture capital financings and strategic and managerial best practices for companies of all types and sizes.

We talked about how the companies getting the highest “BI ROI” connect the dots between their "old" and "new" school strategic planning and thinking.

They are old school (in the absolute best, non-pejorative sense of the term) in that they recognize that strategy

…arrived at through Mastermind get-togethers, through board and advisory board meetings, through strategic planning processes led either internally or by an outside consultant - remains fundamental in attaining and maintaining long-term business success.

And they are new school in their leveraging the very many best-of-breed business application software as services to arrive at this strategy.

Tools like CapitalIQ, Sage, KISSmetrics, AWeber, SurveyMonkey, RingCentral, Campaign Monitor, Zoho, Marketo, CAKE, FuseDesk, Maropost, and Hubspot that automate and optimize traditionally laborious and repetitive business functions.
 
And, as they do, collect massive reams on the marketing, sales, operations, finance and managerial performance of a business.

And, as importantly, the technology has finally matured to where all of this collected data can be organized, analyzed, and benchmarked against comparable - but better performing - companies from around the globe.

This “New School” data wizardry, when combined with old school Masterminding, risk-taking, and a ton of hard work…

…is what allows companies to both run more day to day efficiently and profitably, and more in strategic alignment with their missions and long-term goals than ever before.

Categories:
 

Three Steps to Great Business Strategy…that Sticks


 

It is not hyperbole to define a successful organization as one that finds the balance between a) making the right changes at the right time and b) having the discipline to “keep on keeping on” and just doing more of what is working.

Note well that b) is particularly hard to maintain when the tasks and activities that ARE working become repetitive and lack in excitement and drama.

So how does an organization find this balance - between thinking laterally and creatively and just keeping their heads down and plowing forward?

Well, luckily in the past few years a large and impressive business literature has sprung up that codifies best practices of how to balance this need to incorporate change in an organization with that to maintain doing “more of the good same.”

This thinking can best be summarized by the phrase “Immersion plus Spaced Repetition” and goes like this:

1. Everything, of course, begins with ideas, and the best, business ones normally arise from a series of individually and organizationally introspective strategic planning and goal-setting sessions that clarify objectives and the obstacles standing in the way of their accomplishment.

This immersive process - done at least annually but at organizations with ambition quarterly - both defines what needs to be done and inspires all of the participants to take on the hard and often painful work of getting it done.

The latter point here cannot be underestimated – Thomas Edison famously said that “genius was 99% perspiration and 1% inspiration” but that 1% “spark” is uber-critical in propelling an organization through the first threshold of change.

2. But, as anyone that attended an exciting or invigorating conference or strategic planning session can attest (and as I am sure Mr. Edison reflected on often during long nights at the lab), inspiration fades over time.

Even worse, when the inspiration is not followed through on, cynicism can set in and actually leave an organization worse off than if the planning sessions were never done in the first place!

So how to avoid this distressing fate?

3. Well, by keeping the ideas, goals, and objectives of the planning session alive through their regular review and adjustment.

Think of it this way - if a well-run strategic planning session is the essence of good leadership, then well run, spaced and repetitive goals and objectives reviews are the essence of good management.

Great managers check in with their teams as often as daily – if only for 5 or 10 minutes – to review the day’s objectives and to keep the shorter term work flow aligned with the longer term planning and mission objectives.

The old adage that the only way to eat an elephant is one bite at a time is never more true than when it comes to these spaced and repetitive management check-ins. When done right, they measure, acknowledge, and reward incremental progress and prevent the desire for the perfect from getting in the way of the doable and the done.

Now, at least annually and preferably quarterly, the entire organization needs to reconvene to review actual progress versus stated goals, to assess what worked and what got off track, and then to refine and define updated goals and objectives.

And after this next round of strategic planning sessions, what is to be done?

Well, the spaced and repetitive management check-ins begin anew. Wood is chopped, water is carried.

Following this simple but disciplined formula, over time great ideas become great realities, businesses are built, and legacies and fortunes are made.

And for investors, far more than technology it is these “above the line” leadership and management disciplines that separate the well-run companies to back from the haphazardly ones to avoid.

Categories:
 

Zig's Simple Technique for Building a Great Company


 

If you're not familiar with Zig Ziglar, he was a well-known author, master salesman, and motivational speaker. Unfortunately Zig passed away last November. I apologize for taking so long to honor him with this essay, in which I tell my favorite Zig Ziglar story.

In Zig's early years as a salesman, he visited peoples' homes, making presentations to sell them high-quality cookware.

He had a competent assistant at the time who helped him keep track of appointments and handled administrative duties. One week, however, Zig realized he had two appointments scheduled for the same time. Not waiting to cancel any appointments he asked his assistant to cover one of the appointments for him.

She was terrified.  She did not want to do it and he wasn't going to make her!

Being the consummate salesman that he was, Zig eventually got her to calm down.  Then he assured her that she knew the presentation as well as he did, and that she would do great.  After he solemnly promised to never ask her to do a presentation again, she agreed to cover the appointment just that one time. 

Zig recounts that at the end of the evening, she was convinced she had fumbled half the presentation. But, to her surprise and delight, the clients ordered quite a bit of cookware.  Most surprising, is that when she got over her nerves, she found she rather enjoyed the experience. 

His timid and sales-panicked assistant evolved into a top notch salesperson, was his right hand partner for many years, and years later (with his delighted consent) became a highly-sought out and respected sales trainer for a leading cosmetic company.

Zig shared this story to show human potential.  He puts all the praise on her and generously applauds her for her accomplishments.  While I am inspired by her transformation, I want to focus on his role in her transformation because I believe that was Zig's greatest gift to the business world.  Yes, his sales training is worth bars of gold, but ultimately what really made him a success was his ability to develop others.

He could have made millions as a star salesperson.  He could have kept his philosophy, his techniques, and his secrets to success all to himself.  Instead, he made hundreds of millions by sincerely applying himself to improving everyone around him who was willing to listen.

Zig Ziglar was a true leader.

Yes, he sold books, and videos, made speeches, and made money, but he invested in people.  He believed that the success of a company was largely dependent on the quality of their sales force, and the quality of their sales force was solely dependent on how much that force really cared about helping people.

And, a sales force isn't going to care about helping anyone if they don't feel that their company cares about them. 

Zig could have benched his assistant, sent her right back to her phone and typewriter after she covered that one appointment.  Instead, he nurtured her potential and encouraged her to continue developing her sales skills.  Now think about this, how much more money did Zig make by having her on his team at her full potential instead of at her lowest potential? 

How much more money will your company generate if you make the time to develop your team to their full potential? Beyond just money, how much loyalty will you cultivate? Will you feel more confident about your future success when you have a top-notch team you can trust?  How many talented people will want to work for you when the word gets out about your leadership?

Yes, it takes time and energy, yet Zig demonstrated over and over that when you invest in helping someone be the best version of themselves possible, the rewards, material and otherwise, greatly outweigh the sacrifice.

Zig Ziglar died in November of 2012.  He left behind dozens of books, thousands of hours of video and audio, and most of all, he left behind millions of grateful professionals whose lives were touched and even changed by the empowering lessons he left behind.  His message that you could accomplish more in life and in business through caring and investing in the success of others is a timeless gem that lives on.

As he once said, "You can have everything in life you want, if you will just help other people get what they want."

Rest in peace Zig.  We'll miss you. And for all of you listening, develop your employees and customers, and everyone around you, to their full potential, and you will achieve incredible success!

Categories:
 

Why Businesses Perform and Everyone Else Doesn’t


 

It is remarkable how large the accountability gap has grown between what is considered normal and expected in the world of business and private enterprise…

…and the profound lack of accountability that sadly we have become so accustomed to and from the other major Institutions of our society - Government, Education, Healthcare, Religion, Etc.

It goes like this: Businesses must deliver daily on their product and service promises or a) Customers just stop buying and b) significant reputational damage is effected in this “Online Star Rating” world of ours.

For everybody else? Not so much.

Imagine, with its 9% approval rating, what Congress’ ’“Yelp” / “Trip Advisor” star rating would be?

Or, for that matter, what it would be for our local high school, community college, or hospital?

And, at the risk of controversy, I think most religious leaders would seriously shirk from having their institutions’ reputational scores widely shared with the general public.

Now, one could say that - because the intents of most businesses are so different from these other institutions - that this is an unfair comparison.

Or that we can’t define “accountability” for these other institutions because of the legitimate “values” disagreements within them - i.e. for education is the accountability around teaching say - hard work or creativity? 

For government is it about liberty or equality?  For healthcare longevity or wellness? 

To this I say poppycock!
 
Like for $50,000 per year for average private school tuition, how much hard work and / or creativity are universities really teaching our young?

Or for the 35% of the wealth of our society that local, state, and federal governments appropriate, how much freedom and how much equality are we really getting? Or more prosaically, for what we are paying for it how high is the quality of our airports, roads, schools, and parks?

Or how much wellness are we getting for that $2,600 MRI?

Or that $30,000(!) average hospital stay cost?

The answer, of course, is that if even the most mediocre of businesses were given access to the resources that these other institutions have that the value and customer ROI delivered per dollar spent would increase dramatically.

So how can the ambitious entrepreneur and executive leverage this accountability gap to their advantage and gain?

Well, for starters, step out more and shout from the rooftops how proud you are to be In Business – both in general and specifically as to the value your business delivers.

It is good for our personal psyches, and is inspirational for all when some of the spotlight and attention is taken away by "the other guys."

And then, reflect long hard on the connection between the experiences of your customer, the accountability mindset within your organization, and your business's online reputational scores.

Improving any of them is almost always dependent on improving all of them.

Through this Kaizen - this commitment to constant improvement - will not just further widen the accountability gap between business and all of the other institutions of our society…

…but that between our tightly measured and always improving enterprises and our more “fuzzily run” competition.

Categories:
 

GTK’s and Pillsbury’s Internet of Things Executive Event - 2015 Edition


 

I had the good fortune to attend and participate in GTK Partners and Pillsbury's Internet of Things (IoT) Executive Event in Palo Alto last week.

It was business star-studded affair - 150 Silicon Valley technology executives and investors gathered together to network and brainstorm on IoT - described by many as fundamental a technology shift as the emergence of the Internet itself was in the 1990's.

As I wrote after the 2014 event, this premise of a world where online connectedness is no longer a computer/ tablet/smart phone thing, but is now woven into the very fabric of our cars, buildings, equipment, minds, and bodies is unnerving to many, including to the event’s panelists from companies like Chevron, Cisco, CSAA, Invensense, Schneider Electric, Splunk, Stanford Health Care, and the U.S. Navy.

But far more then balancing this threat and concern is the almost limitless variety of New Business Models, Work Process Improvements and Personal Delights an IoT world makes increasingly possible.

New Business Models. The ability to measure outputs, in real time, allows for fractionalized delivery of traditional industrial services - like as mentioned by Splunk CTO Snehal Antani - the rental and leasing forklifts not by a period of time (i.e. hour, day, year) but instead by the amount of lift of weight lifted and moved.

The result? Both a vast expansion of a potential customer base for a product/service and a delivery of it in exactly the way those new customers wish to purchase and consume.

Work Process Improvements. Panelists ranging from Chevron's CIO Alysia Green to Stanford Healthcare's CIO Dr. Pravene Nath made the powerful point that an Internet-connected sensor on “everything” allows for work process improvements ranging from the safety of a refinery technician approaching a pressurized valve to the ability to predict the exact time when a doctor will see their patient. On a case x case basis, perhaps barely noticeable incremental improvements, but transformative in their aggregate.

Personal Delights. For me, the most inspirational takeaway from the gathering was IoT’s under-stated potential to make our lives more “Personally Delightful” on a day-to-day basis.

This vision was best shared by Enjoy.com CEO Ron Johnson, most famous for leading, alongside Steve Jobs, the development and success of the Apple Stores retail model.

At the event Ron shared his vision for Enjoy, where customers buy and have delivered and installed IoT devices like iPhones, Sonos Home Theater Systems, Withings Smart Body Analyzers, GoPro Cameras, and of course laptops and desktops.

His key point was that only in a “Internet-Connected Sensors Everywhere: IoT world is the Enjoy business model possible – one where Enjoy can hire, train, and deploy highly competenet and empathetic “Fellow Humans” to show and teach us how to make all of the IOT things in our life work for, empower, and not frustrate us.

So whether we like it or not, The IoT world is both here and coming.

What GTK's and Pillsbury’s IoT event taught me last week is that we can make money in it, be safe in it, and with a little help from our Internet friends, enjoy it too.

Categories:
 

5 Techniques to Scare Competitors Out of the Market


 

On many levels, competition is good.

For example, when you start a business, you want there to be competition. Since if there was no competition, there may not be a market or customers who want to buy what you are selling.

And once in business, competition is generally good since it forces your company to get better. It forces you to better satisfy customers (or they will choose your competitors) and it forces you to become more efficient (so you reap more profits even if you have offer more competitive pricing).

Now, while competition does provide these advantages, you clearly want to have less competition, and you'd like for fewer new competitors to enter the market. In doing so, you'll enjoy more of a monopoly in your market, which means more customers and more profits.

The best way to knock competitors out of your market and discourage new entrants is to build "business assets" that your competitors don't have. (I define "business assets" as resources you build now that will give you and your company future economic value.)

Here are five examples of business assets you can build:

1. Customers: Most mobile phone companies offer 2 year service contracts that all new customers must sign (and face penalties if they leave before the two years are up). This essentially "locks up" customers making it harder for new entrants (or existing entrants) to come in the market and take their customers. Customer agreements and contracts are one of the most powerful business assets you can build.

2. Systems: Most franchise organizations (e.g., Subway, McDonalds, etc.) have made significant investments in systems in areas such as taking orders, producing products, handling customer complaints, etc. These systems make it easier and less expensive to hire and train employees and better service customers. This makes it harder for others to compete against them. Likewise, I know many companies who have built customized software systems that allow them to perform faster, cheaper, and more consistently than their competitors.

3. PPE (Plant, Property and Equipment): When I was a teenager, I made a lot of money shoveling snow. I used that money to buy a snow blowing machine. Equipped with the snow blowing machine, I was able to remove snow ten times faster than my competitors. This allowed me to dominate my local market.

4. Product or Service Variations: A local pizza shop promotes itself as having 36 varieties of pizza. Offering this large variety makes it harder for new pizza companies to enter the market. Because a new company would have a very hard time creating 36 varieties from the start, it would be harder for them to satisfy customers.

5. Exclusive Partnerships: Creating exclusive partnerships could be a key business asset that gives you competitive advantage. For example, if you create exclusive partnerships with top organizations in your industry, they would only work with you and not your competitors. For example, let's say you and a competitor both serve the senior market. But you have an exclusive relationship with the AARP whereby they only promote you, and not your competitors. With 37 million senior members, your AARP relationship would give you considerable advantage.

What I want you to consider now is how you can build business assets that "unlevel the playing field." How can you make it so that nobody wants to compete against you?

  • Can you lock-up customers with agreements and contracts?

  • Can you build new systems to make your company more effective and efficient?

  • Can you make investments in plant, property and equipment that allow you to cut costs or increase output?

  • Can you develop new product and/or service options that better serve customer needs?

  • Can you form exclusive partnerships to help you gain new customers that your competitors can't?


Importantly, whatever answers you come up with, realize that building these business assets will take time. Often times they may take as much as a year (or even longer). And also realize that short-term profits may go down when you are building them. For example, in the AARP example above, forging such a relationship could take 6-months, during which you invest lots of time and generate no incremental revenue.

But, once the asset is built, you may profit (and profit big) for years.

So make sure to properly plan and prioritize the development of your business assets, even though they often have less short-term benefits than other activities (such as setting up a new advertising campaign).

Set a long-term goal for when you want the assets built. And make sure that you build time into your daily, weekly and monthly schedules to move the development forward. Doing so will dramatically improve your revenues and profits, and at the dismay of your competitors who will be forced to go elsewhere.

Categories:
 

Finding the Signals in the Noise?


 

I recently shared why business intelligence dashboards are now a must have for executives seeking to better understand, leverage, and ultimately profit from the treasure troves of data surrounding their businesses.

This data includes insight from their companies’ web and social media traffic, from its e-mail send and open rates, from its lead tracking systems and sales logs, from its product fulfillment records, and from its accounting software as it records revenues, expenses, and cash flows.

Pretty basic stuff, eh?

Well, maybe when viewed one source at a time, and/or over a limited time period with just a few data points, but given that a business doing as little as $1 million in revenues now has on average more than 20 data sources – from software services like Google Analytics, Salesforce, Quickbooks, ZenDesk, to dozens of Excel files and spreadsheets of every type and purpose, figuring what to do with it all quickly gets overwhelming.

And in business, when something gets overwhelming, what happens?

Nothing.

Yes, all of these treasure troves of data, insight, and intelligence just gets ignored.

Reports aren’t run. Or when they are run, they aren't read.

And when they are read, they are not really mined for insight, for “aha” moments and breakthroughs, for competitive advantage.

This sad state of affairs is the unfortunate reality for most executives in this information-overloaded business world of ours.

But not for everybody.

There are a select few that as opposed to being overwhelmed, are energized by all of this precious and unprecedented data.

That use it to both inform and confirm their "gut."

And when the data and their guts disagree? Well, more often than not they let the data hold the trump card.

These executives worship at the altars of both big and little things.

Big things like strategy, mission, vision, values, and culture.

But little things too like form conversion stats, proposal close ratios, page bounce rates, call hold times, quick ratios, and net margin growth to name a few.

How do they do it?

Well, first per the above, they have a functional relationship with data. They don’t whine about it nor are they consumed with how much of it there is.

And secondly, they don’t try to sift through and make sense of it by themselves.

They let technology do a lot of work for them. Both predictive analytics technologies like Civis, Kxen, Foresee, Angoss, and Verisium.

And strategic and business intelligence dashboard technologies like Domo, Pentaho, Birst, GoodData, and my firm Guiding Metrics.

Technologies that find the signals in the noise, and that help them win both the big and little games of modern business.

So now, how about you?

To Your Success,


--

Jay Turo

CEO

Growthink

P.S. Like to demo our dashboard offering? Then Click Here to learn more.

Categories:
 

7 Ways to Outsmart Your Competition


 

"Knowledge is power." This is a well known saying commonly attributed to Sir Francis Bacon, who was an English philosopher, statesman, scientist and author.

In business, knowledge certainly is power. For example, if you knew where your market was heading, you would have a massive leg up on your competition.

So, how can you gain more knowledge to outsmart your competition? Here are 7 ways.

1. Learn from your customers.
Marketing consultant Jay Abraham once said, "your customers are geniuses; they know exactly what they want."

Because your customers know what they want, speak to them. And don't just speak to your current customers, but speak to your competitors' customers too. Learn to listen deeply to your customers and to ask probing questions. And when you hear consistent feedback (and not just one customer saying something), take action.

2. Learn from your competitors.
Watch your competitors closely and learn from them. What do they seem to be doing well, and how can you better emulate them in this respect? What are they doing poorly that you can capitalize on?

Importantly, don't just copy your competitors until you know that what they are doing works. For example, if a competitor starts offering a 25% off discount for new customers, don't copy them right away. Rather, wait and see what happens. If the competitor stops offering the discount quickly, then the promotion probably didn't work. Conversely, if the competitor is still offering the discount 6 months later, it probably did work. Only copy the competitor's "winners."

Also try to figure out what competitors are saying about you. And, if criticism from a competitor gets back to you, don't become defense or dismiss it casually. Rather, engage critically with it. The criticism may prove to be quite helpful. A competitor may be aware of your weaknesses in a way a friend or customer cannot be. So don't disregard negative feedback, but rather consider it carefully, and take corrective action as appropriate. 

3. Learn from your employees.
Oftentimes your employees have a lot more information than you do. They are the ones who are interacting with customers, and they are the ones that are building your products and providing your services.

Speak to your employees and get their feedback, ideas and suggestions. As an example, nearly all new innovation at Toyota comes from front-line employees. Encourage your employees to come up with ideas and give you feedback. They may also alert you to changes in the marketplace and customer behavior that you need to understand in order to adapt.

4. Learn from your community.
This is particularly true for local businesses. Find out what is going on in your community. For example, if your community is heavily involved in recycling, or if the local high school football team just won a championship, then you need to know about it since these are things your community cares about. Importantly, leverage this information. In these two examples, you could offer a sale related to the football team's victory. Or post signs explaining how your business recycles. These actions would position you as part of the community and cause customers to flock to your business.

5. Learn from coaches and consultants.
The right coach and/or consultant will have lots of knowledge that you don't. They will have worked with other business owners and "been there, done that" - that is, they will have seen challenges and overcome them already. Because you won't have to "reinvent the wheel," these paid experts can allow you to make the right decisions, avoid mistakes, and grow more quickly. Plus, paid experts can give your business a reality check and keep you focused and accountable.

6. Learn from mentors.
The right mentor serves a similar function as a paid coach and/or consultant in that they have experience, expertise and connections that allow you to avoid mistakes and grow your business more quickly. The challenge is finding the right mentor, and setting up the appropriate structure to get ongoing feedback (this naturally happens when you pay a coach or consultant).

7. Learn from other business owners. In previous articles, I have mentioned the massive power of mastermind groups. Mastermind groups are groups of business owners who work together to grow everyone's business. Mastermind groups are incredibly powerful since other members of the group will have already overcome the challenges you face, and thus can give you the answers you need.

Likewise, in many cases, skills and knowledge that have taken other business owners months or years to learn can be transferred to you in minutes. So, you gain massive knowledge quickly, and gain a support group that all shares the common goal of building a great company.

Knowledge certainly is power. Leverage these seven ways to gain knowledge, and you will be able to outsmart and dominate your competition.

Categories:
 

Modern Business Wisdoms from Ricky Roma (among others)


 

"Why don't my prospects buy? “Even after - especially after - I demonstrate (and they agree!) such awesome ROI from purchasing my offerings?

This palatable lament has been expressed by entrepreneurs and salespeople since time immemorial, but perhaps never so consistently and discouragingly as in this "Buyer Power" Internet Era of ours.

Yes, no matter what product or service we are selling these days, it is quite likely being received in the market by some frustrating combination of apathy, distraction, and a “commoditized” pricing pressure response.

As I have written before, statistics show that this phenomenon is accelerating and for sellers becoming even more vexing because - quite simply - buyers are just spending so much time and energy on their mobile phones to pay attention to anything else!

The result - especially for higher-priced offerings - is buyers not having the attention span to "Stay with Us" through a Problem Definition, Solution Scoping, and Work Proposal as is typical and necessary in a complex sales process.

So, in spite of the speed of communication being quicker than ever, paradoxically decision-making timelines are stretched and even more frustratingly, buyers are giving sellers “More of that Maddening Thing” than ever before: Radio Silence.

Radio Silence, or Buyer Non-Response has driven even the mentally toughest of us to a dark, philosophical place from which the only way out is by being far stronger and more committed to the value of our products and services then we are empathetic to the trials, tribulations, and competing commitments (of time and energy and everything else) of our buyers.

Yes, in the infamous words of David Mamet’s Glengarry Glen Ross’ character Ricky Roma, anyone that has “Spent a Day in their Life” can attest that only through this kind of mental toughness can we truly “Breakthrough” and get our message Heard and Bought.

Now, a bit more idealistically, this mental toughness need has another key dimension:  Getting Fully Comfortable with Full Transparency.

Buyers - with quick swipes of their thumbs and clicks of their mouses - can find out just about everything about us and the value, real and perceived, that our customers have gotten/are getting from our offerings.

They can find out directly - and painfully - from the very many product and seller Rating Sites and indirectly but as powerfully via the quantity and quality of traffic and interest that our websites and social media postings receive and garner.

And when the reviews are bad and web traffic and social media non-existent?

Well, as opposed to cursing to the Internet Gods about the unfairness of it all, the Effective Executive instead takes these on as both challenges and as Charges to Keep.

A challenge to get one's happy clients to digitally share their experiences.

And a challenge to deliver and develop value-added Thought Leadership Content (No more sales schmaltz!) that shows (not tells!) our unique value-add.

And a Charge to Keep because if we can't get happy customers to talk about us or if we can’t share ideas of value to our target audience, well then it is time to roll up our sleeves and to work harder and smarter so we can and do.

And as we do this, we will develop a conviction so deep that no amount of distraction and/or apathy can shake or stand against it.

And then that palatable lament of "Why Aren't They Buying" will turn to that wonderful spirit and sense of possibility when the sale is made and the deal done.

Categories:
 

Venture Funding Advisors: How to Find, Secure & Leverage Them


 

If you're looking for funding and/or to successfully grow your business, a little known secret is to find and leverage Advisors.    

So, who or what are Advisors? Advisors are successful people that you respect and that agree to help your company. Advisors are generally successful and/or retired executives, business owners, service providers, professors, or others that could help your business.    

Advisors generally will not cost you any money (you don't pay them), although I do recommend giving them stock options to incentivize them to contribute as much as possible.   

Getting Advisors is not a requirement for raising money, but they have multiple benefits as follows:

1. Practice: if you can't successfully pitch an advisor to invest time in your business, then you're not going to successfully pitch anyone to invest money in your business. So, practice your pitch on prospective advisors first, and use that practice to perfect it.

2. Connections to capital: as successful individuals, advisors often have the ability to invest directly in your company; and/or they tend to have large, high quality networks of individuals they can introduce you to.

3. Credibility: having quality advisors gives your company instant credibility in the eyes of lenders and investors.  For example, if you started a new hockey stick company, having Wayne Gretzky as an advisor would certainly give you great credibility (and connections). But even having much smaller names than Wayne Gretzky as advisors can build enormous credibility.

4. Operational success: In an interview I did with Dr. Basil Peters (a wonderfully successful entrepreneur, angel investor and VC), Dr. Peters said that mentors and advisors are an entrepreneur's "single most controllable success factor."  Having Advisors with whom you can discuss key business matters as you grow your venture will help ensure you make the right decisions, particularly if they have encountered and dealt with the same challenges already in their careers.

I have seen these four benefits first-hand for my own companies and for companies that we've helped build their own boards. Click here if you'd like to see the list and bios of Growthink's Board of Advisors.

So, how do you build your Board of Advisors?

The steps are fairly simple:

1. Create a list of people you would like to be on your Board
2. Contact and meet with them
3. Secure the best Advisors you meet with

The final step is to hold formal and informal meetings with your Board members to leverage them -- to get them to fund your company or introduce you to other funding sources; to answer key challenges that you are facing, etc.

I must admit that years ago I wasn't thrilled about investing the time to go through the steps of creating a Board of Advisors. But I can assure you; those hours spent have yielded an enormous return on investment. In fact, I should have developed my Board much sooner than I did.

So, go out there and start building your Board of Advisors today. And start reaping the enormous benefits.
   
Suggested Resource: Want advisors? Want funding for your business? Then check out our Truth About Funding program to learn how you can gain advisors and access the 41 sources of funding available to entrepreneurs like you. Click here to learn more.

Categories:
 
Syndicate content

Get a Free Consultation
with a Growthink Expert

Click Here